Books and special issues of journals – Deadlines January to March 2021

Eco-Georgic: From Antiquity to the Anthropocene
Ecozon@ 12.2 Autumn 2021
Deadline for full articles: 15 Januay 2021

Guest Editors: Sue Edney (University of Bristol), Philipp Erchinger (University of Duesseldorf) and Pippa Marland (University of Leeds)

Georgic, a genre or mode of writing about agricultural labour and rural life, is typically concerned with ways of being at work in an environment that tends to overtake or resist all human efforts to master it. As David Fairer has argued, georgic nature is always, to some degree, out of tune with our human endeavours to live in agreement with it (2011). It therefore constantly challenges us to adapt to its changing conditions. In Virgil’s Georgics, for example, human activities of cultivation and construction are repeatedly threatened to be overrun or swept away by the life of the more-than-human world–the world of pests, storms and droughts–in and through which they have to proceed. Georgic work, in short, takes place in a “world in process whose rewards are hard won” (Fairer 2015: 111). Hence the genre’s interest in all products of human skill and invention by means of which the earth, not necessarily a comfortable place, can be made to yield its fruits (Beck 2004). Yet, while georgic, from today’s perspective, is often quickly dismissed as being deeply implicated in outdated anthropocentric and nationalist ideologies of cultural improvement, industrialisation, exploitation and colonisation, it also addresses a number of questions about the relations between human and nonhuman spheres that, in our contemporary historical moment, seem urgent and fresh.

Thus, this issue of Ecozon@, taking its cue from Fairer’s concept of “Eco-Georgic” (2011), proceeds from the assumption that the georgic mode, with its interest in the messy involvement of human and nonhuman action, resonates with current debates in ecocriticism and the environmental humanities. Like much recent work in this field (Abram 1996, Alaimo 2010, Bennett 2010, Moore 2015), georgic literature often presents human culture as a way of working through, rather than being opposed to, nature. The daily work of sustaining, understanding, refining, and transforming human existence, it suggests, is inextricably caught up in, rather than separate from, the evolution of non-human matter and life. Last but not least, the georgic tradition affords a consideration of the changing functions of literature. For georgic has always reflected the use of the pen through the work of the plough, creating analogies between the making of poetry and the cultivation of the land. As a result, it poses questions about the relationship between the arts of writing and farming and, more generally, between literary and non-literary ways of working with the material world.

We invite articles that explore the ecology of georgic literature in all its theoretical and historical implications and shades. Conceptually, we encourage contributors to think of georgic in three ways: as a specific generic tradition that has its roots in Hesiod and Virgil, reaching its heyday in seventeenth and eighteenth-century verse; as a more fluid way of writing that, as “a rhizomatic underpresence” (Goodman 2004: 1), has remained influential throughout the history of literature, informing not only poems, but also fictional prose, essays and travel reports; and, finally, as a mode that is gaining new relevance and vitality as contemporary writers increasingly find themselves “writing to” the multifaceted crisis of the Anthropocene.

Submissions could address, but are not limited to, one of the following topics:

  • Re-readings of the georgic tradition in the light of ecological and ecocritical concerns
  • Issues, such as human-animal relations or the weather, that are relevant to the georgic tradition
  • Farming and literature
  • Anthropological and ecological aspects of literary labour or work
  • Cultural histories of soil
  • Georgic’s relation to pastoral and other genres
  • Rewilding, wilding, land sharing
  • Georgic ontology and epistemology
  • Queer and feminist Eco-Georgic
  • Georgic and contemporary ecocritical theory
  • Anthropocene Georgic

Please direct any queries to the editors Sue Edney (sue.edney@bristol.ac.uk), Philipp Erchinger (Philipp.Erchinger@uni-duesseldorf.de), and Pippa Marland (P.J.Marland@leeds.ac.uk).

Manuscripts of 6000-8000 words may be submitted via the journal platform as early as December 2020 and no later than January 15, 2021. Authors must comply with the guidelines indicated on the platform. Title, abstracts, and keywords must be provided in the language of the article, English, and Spanish. MLA style should be used for citations. Permission must be obtained by the author for any images used, and the images should be included in the text. Manuscripts will be accepted in English, German, and French. Though it is not an essential requirement, we highly encourage potential authors to make prior contact with the editors by submitting a preliminary abstract (approximately 500 words).

References:

Abram, David. The Spell of the Sensuous: Perception and Language in a More-than-Human World, Vintage Books, 1996.
Alaimo, Stacy. Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and the Material Self, Indiana UP, 2010.
Beck, Rudolph. ‘From Industrial Georgic to Industrial Sublime: English Poetry and the Early Stages of the Industrial Revolution’, The British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 27.1, (2004):  17-36.
Bennett, Jane. Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things, Duke UP, 2010.
Fairer, David. ‘“Where fuming trees refresh the thirsty air”: The World of Eco-Georgic’, Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 40 (2011): 201-18.
Fairer, David. “The Pastoral-Georgic Tradition”, in: William Wordsworth in Context, ed. Andrew Bennett, Cambridge UP, 2015, 111-118.
Goodman, Kevis. Georgic Modernity and British Romanticism, Cambridge UP, 2004.
Moore, Jason W. Capitalism in the Web of Life, Verso, 2015.

(posted 22 February 2020)


Pandemics in European Literature (20th – 21st ce.): Theory and Practice
A special issue of Journal Interlitterara
Deadline for proposals: 31 January 2021

Guest Editors:

  • Nikoleta Zampaki, PhD Candidate of Modern Greek Philology, Department of Philology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece; e-mail: nikzamp@phil.uoa.gr, nikoletazampaki@hotmail.com
  • Peggy Karpouzou, Assistant Professor of Theory of Literature, Department of Philology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece; e-mail: pkarpouzou@phil.uoa.gr

Paper proposals are invited for a special issue on the topic of Pandemics in European Literature (20th – 21st ce.): Theory and Practice and they might explore the topic of pandemics in the European Literature. Over time disease outbreaks have ravaged humanity, sometimes changing the course of history. From Homer’s Iliad which starts with a plague that strikes the Greek army at Troy there are numerous examples of contagion fables (plagues, epidemics, infectious diseases, etc.) into the European canon, among the most outstanding are certainly The Decameron, written by Renaissance humanist Giovanni Boccaccio in the late 1340s and early 1350s, Daniel Defoe’s A Journal of the Plague Year (1722), Mary Shelley’s, The Last Man (1826), Jack London’s The Scarlet Plague (1912) and Albert Camus, La Peste (1947). We will highlight the notion of pandemics, thought as a very large epidemic, through variable European literary texts, the impact on the people and their culture as well as the psychological dimensions that caused to humanity.

Papers might address questions like the following:

  • Which are the representations of pandemics in the Εuropean Literary tradition (20th-21st) and genres like science fiction, apocalyptic fiction, climate fiction, traveling writing? How can pandemics be represented through the different local literary traditions?
  • How did European Literature and Culture contribute to quarantine time? How did authors continue to write through the time of pandemics?
  • How can society and individuals live through the sense of isolation and loss of community? How is their identity shaped and which is the social impact of pandemics? Which is the role of biopolitics and necropolitics in this direction?
  • How about the impact of Ethics into Pandemics and vice versa?
  • How can self-quarantine create an opportunity for increased engagement with environmental humanities and animal studies?
  • May we investigate any nexus between pandemics and feminism or eco- feminism?
  • Which is the relationship of pandemics and post humanities? Should we consider different representations of meta-bodies into today’s literary texts?
  • Could be found any scientific discourses of pandemics into European Literature?
  • May we contribute any ideas arising from our research to the current pandemic literature and what concerns may be pushed to the background now that pandemics dominate the headlines, but are still relevant and happening at the same time?
  • How could pandemics construct or establish variable narrations today? May we consider a new pandemic theory as a new sub-form at the era of Anthropocene?

Through this call we focus on a variety of pandemic dimensions in the European Literature and we aim to provide broader scientific and cultural context for it. To cover the global scope of the topic, we seek contributions from around the world. Interested authors should send an abstract of no more than 300 words, a brief bio (c. 200 words) and 3-5 key words at both Guest Editors’ emails by the 31st of January 2021. Authors will be informed about whether their proposals have been accepted after the deadline. The call targets an academic and professional audience and all papers should follow the journal’s guidelines of submissions and policy. Please follow the guidelines for the submission [https://ojs.utlib.ee/index.php/IL/about/submissions] and the articles’ word count should be approximately 6.000 words. Please do not hesitate to contact us with any queries you might have.

(posted 22 June 2020)


Cross-pollination: Literature, Journalism, Literary Journalism
Cadernos de Literatura Comparada, nr 44 (June 2021)
Deadline for proposals: 31 January 2021

Guest editors: Jorge Bastos da Silva (University of Porto) and Isabel Soares (University of Lisbon)

Intersections between literature and journalism are manifold. Common ground both depends and bears on a set of shared technologies, ranging from verbal language itself to the material resources of manuscript, print and digital communication. Over the centuries, many writers of literature have been professional journalists and learned from the trade – and vice-versa. Periodical publications regularly report on literary activity, even when that is not their main focus, and a number specialize in following literary writing old and new by means of critical reviews, interviews, etc. Simultaneously, literary journalism, understood as a distinctive genre of long narrative non-fiction, or journalism written with a literary flair, has established its ground and produced a canon of acknowledged writers and won a Nobel.

This issue of Cadernos de Literatura Comparada addresses the connections between literature and journalism from an international, plurivocal perspective. We welcome articles that cover any of the topics relevant to the general theme of the issue, including (but not limited to) the following:

  • literature, journalism and the professionalization of writing
  • literature, journalism and the ethics of writing
  • the relationship between fiction and non-fiction
  • the genres of literature and the genres of journalism
  • (literary) writers and/in the press
  • writing techniques in literature and journalism
  • verbal and visual: writing, illustrating, photographing, mapping, graphing
  • historical approaches to literature and journalism
  • the (literary) writer and the journalist as intellectuals
  • forms of writing, social diagnosis and social change

The journal will also have its usual “Varia” section.
Proposals of book reviews may also be sent to the editors of this issue.
E-mail: cadernospreviewjune@gmail.com
Submission preparation checklist: https://ilc-cadernos.com/index.php/cadernos/about/submissions
Deadline for the submission of contributions: 31 January 2021

(posted 10 August 2020)


Internet trolling and online participation in the context of the science, technology and engineering of educational systems
A speical issue of ESOCEL 2021
Deadline for manuscripts: 31 January 2021

Special Issue Editors
Dr. Jonathan Bishop Website
Guest Editor
Congress of Researchers and Organisations for Cybercommunity, E-Learning and Socialnomics. Swansea SA1 9NN, UK.
Interests: e-moderation; cyberhate; gamification; e-politics

Dr. Jason Barratt
Guest Editor
Congress of Researchers and Organisations for Cybercommunity, E-Learning and Socialnomics. Swansea SA1 9NN, UK.
Interests: E-Dating, Usability/Accessibility research

Special Issue Information

This Special Issue is seeking papers on Internet trolling and online participation in the context of the science, technology and engineering of educational systems.

It will draw together ways of providing online learning, including through e-tivities, serious games, gamification, managed learning environments, MOOCs, and virtual worlds. It will also look at ways of managing online learning, including e-moderation, dealing with wellbeing issues like digital addiction and cyberbullying as well as the digital divide and accessibility.

Topics covered and welcome for submission include the following:

  • Participation inequality; lurking, the free-rider problem;
  • Online harassment; flame trolling, cyberbullying, cyberstalking;
  • Transgressive humour, ‘trolling for the lulz’, viral humour, R.I.P trolling;
  • Online Community moderation, perspectives on ‘don’t feed the troll’, blocking users (i.e., ‘ban-hammering’);
  • Online learning issues: retention, motivation;
  • Participation initiatives: Classroom 2.0, eParticipation;

Manuscript Submission Information

This Special Issue of Education Sciences on Online Communities and E-Learning is seeking papers on Internet trolling and online participation in the context of the science, technology and engineering of educational systems.

It will draw together ways of providing online learning, including through e-tivities, serious games, gamification, managed learning environments, MOOCs, and virtual worlds. It will also look at ways of managing online learning, including e-moderation, dealing with wellbeing issues like digital addiction and cyberbullying as well as the digital divide and accessibility.

Topics covered and welcome for submission include the following:

  • Participation inequality; lurking, the free-rider problem;
  • Online harassment; flame trolling, cyberbullying, cyberstalking;
  • Transgressive humour, ‘trolling for the lulz’, viral humour, R.I.P trolling;
  • Online Community moderation, perspectives on ‘don’t feed the troll’, blocking users (i.e., ‘ban-hammering’);
  • Online learning issues: retention, motivation;
  • Participation initiatives: Classroom 2.0, eParticipation;

For more information on the submission process visit the website above./athttps://www.mdpi.com/journal/education/special_issues/online_communities_e_learning

Guest Editors are:

* Jonathan Bishop (jonathan.bishop@crocels.ac.uk)

* Jason Barratt (jason.barratt@crocels.ac.uk)

(posted 26 August 2020)


Strangers and Trespassers in Contemporary Women’s Crime Fiction (2000-2020)
A special issue of Papers on Language and Literature (Southern Illinois University Edwardsville)
Deadline for submissions: 15 Februay 2021

Guest editors: Carla Rodríguez González and Esther Álvarez López (Universidad de Oviedo)

Crime fiction is a “strange” genre situated at the paradoxical coordinates of best-selling success and academic marginality, whose multifarious manifestations trespass genre and gender boundaries. In spite of the highly masculinized associations of the mystery genre, the work of influential female writers has always been part of this tradition, starting with the pioneering contributions of Agatha Christie, Patricia Wentworth, Dorothy Sayers and Ruth Rendell. These writers and the many who have successfully followed in their literary footsteps have proved that the investigation of crime is also a suitable job for a woman. Trespassing symbolic spaces, and navigating and contending the phallocentrism of investigative work is inherent in this writing, which often requires a form of strangeness on the part of its protagonists. Contemporary authors often place their characters in this unstable position from which they challenge gender roles, while subverting notions about women’s independence and intellectual prowess. This appropriation of strangeness as a strategic analytical device can be traced in the works of, among others, Megan Abbott, Gillian Flynn, Tana French, Elizabeth Hand, Paula Hawkins, Val McDermid, Denise Mina and Gloria White, in novels that could be classified according to countless labels ranging from domestic noir to cozy, hard-boiled or forensic, to mention but a few.

The stranger is an enduring literary figure that has been associated with binary relationships: “inside/outside, known/unknown, fear/safety, familiar/unfamiliar” (Jackson et al 2017: 9). Strangers are not only coupled with detachment, unbelonging and disturbing, but also with freedom and objectivity, as Georg Simmel’s influential essay contends: they are “bound by no commitments which could prejudice [their] perception, understanding and evaluation of the given” (1950: 402). This ambivalent interstitial figure rather than reinforcing social, cultural and physical boundaries problematizes them as permeable and unstable. More recent conceptualizations have focused on the affective value of the stranger in relation to the collective processes involved in the delimitation and construction of acceptability and conviviality. Sara Ahmed argues that emotions create boundaries between people, determining who belongs and who does not through “affective judgements” (2004: 211). Trespassing these boundaries involves encountering otherness, reevaluating the self and the affective scaffolding that sustains all social relations.

Strangeness and trespassing are particularly ingrained in women’s crime fiction, as the investigation carried out usually implies unveiling the construction of social emotions, appealing to collective responsibility for the lack of support provided to the victims and reclaiming spaces of representation from an awareness of gender imbalance. As such, this special issue will explore different portrayals of strangeness and trespassing of social boundaries in the fiction produced by women crime writers in the twenty-first century. The main focus will be the examination of alternative approaches to detection from a gender perspective that identifies new rationalities in the crime fiction genre. As such, possible topics to address include, but are not restricted to:

  • Trespassing boundaries, creating new spaces
  • Strange encounters, amateur sleuths and private eyes
  • The figure of the stranger and the trespasser in domestic noir
  • Contesting gender in the hard-boiled tradition
  • Legal and medical strangers
  • Psychological suspense, thrillers and the stranger within
  • Trans/nationalism and cosmopolitanism
  • Ethics and aesthetics of contemporary women’s crime fiction
  • Movement, displacement and negotiations of the city
  • Affect and embodiment of urban spaces
  • The politics of space: gender, class, ethnicity
  • Institutional violence and transversal allegiances
  • In/visibility, otherness and uncanny spaces
  • Alternative itineraries and urban rhythms
  • Trespassing genres: crime, speculative, fantastic, historical fiction.

References:
Ahmed, Sara 2000. Strange Encounters: Embodied Others in Post-Coloniality. London: Routledge.
—— 2004. The Cultural Politics of Emotions. London: Routledge.
Bauman, Zygmunt 1995. “Making and Unmaking of Strangers.” Thesis Eleven 43: 1-16.
Dean, Jodi 1996. Solidarity of Strangers. Feminism after Identity Politics. Los Angeles: U. of California P.
Jackson, Lucy, Catherine Harris and Gill Valentine 2017. “Rethinking Concepts of the Strange and the Stranger.” Social and Cultural Geography 18.1: 1-15.
Kristeva, Julia 1991. Strangers to Ourselves. New York. Columbia UP.
Marotta, Vince 2010. “The Cosmopolitan Stranger.” Questioning Cosmopolitanism. Eds. S. van Hooft and W. Vandekerckhove. Springer.
—— 2017. Theories of the Stranger: Debates on Cosmopolitanism, Identity and Cross-Cultural Encounters. New York: Routledge.
Simmel, Georg 1950. “The Stranger.” The Sociology of Georg Simmel. Ed. and trans. Kurt H. Wilff. Glencoe, Il: The Free Press. 402-408.

Notes for contributors:
Contributors should follow the current edition of the MLA Handbook, and manuscripts should be free of all identifying information.
Submissions (7,000-8,000 words) must not be under consideration elsewhere.

They should be sent by 15 February 2021 to rodriguezcarla@uniovi.es and eal@uniovi.es, specifying “Submission: Special Issue Strangers Crime Fiction” in the subject line”.  Attach the essay in the form of a PDF file. Include an abstract of no more than 150 words in the body of the e-mail. Also include a postal mailing address and a phone number.

Please direct any queries to the guest editors: Carla Rodríguez González (rodriguezcarla@uniovi.es) and Esther Alvarez (eal@uniovi.es).

(posted 6 August 2020)