Books and special issues of journals – Deadlines October to December 2020

Fine-combing the past: frames, patterns and metaphors
Études Irlandaises, French Journal of Irish Studies, Spring/Summer 2021 issue
Deadline for proposals: 15 Octobe 2020

Issue editors: Nathalie SEBBANE et Mathew STAUNTON

The raison d’être of this thematic issue is to showcase innovative, experimental and disruptive approaches to transforming the traces of the Irish past into evidence and narratives from as broad a range of perspectives as possible.

Feeding the processes involved in working through the past that are expressed by the German word vergangenheitsbewältigung through an Irish Studies prism, we reinscribe the Irish expression mionchíoradh an am atá caite (fine-combing the past) as a prompt for engaging with and processing the time before our perpetual present and organising the articles in this volume.

As in the German, the Irish phrase implies the evolution, renovation or creation of methodologies to disentangle and sift the traces of the past and carefully work towards healthier narratives. Simultaneously, Cíoradh also implies disturbing, shaking things up, harassing and aggravating, and we are particularly interested in subjects that are generally avoided: the difficult, unpopular, awkward, inconvenient, undocumented, invisible and impossible.

As Ireland moved into modernity concerted efforts were made to turn a page on its past without having fully examined issues such as child and institutional abuse, racism, anti-Semitism, homophobia, and colonialism. Some see no contradiction in advertising a track record in human rights even though a thorough and proper examination of a past (and present) of human rights abuses has not been undertaken. This task has often been left to journalists and politicians, who have offered partial, partisan and altogether unsatisfactory narrative starting points that historians have been slow to engage with. Unhappily, many issues impacting the lives of ordinary people remain unaddressed and the past is aestheticized as what should have been rather than what was and was not.

The aim of this publication is to question existing narratives of the past and explore ways and means of achieving more truthful, joyful, playful, irreverent and, ultimately, more satisfying versions by engaging with experimental methodologies and unexplored sources.

Contributions are welcome on (but by no means limited to) the following issues:

  • Archival research
  • Archeological assessment
  • Genealogy
  • Literary criticism
  • Memory and commemorations
  • Visual/material culture
  • Evidence, traces, visibility and invisibility, shame
  • Representations, perceptions
  • Narrative(s)

Articles, along with an abstract and a list of keywords, should be submitted no later than October 15, 2020, to:
nathalie.sebbane@sorbonne-nouvelle.fr
mathew.staunton@gmail.com

(posted 8 June 2020)


The New Woman and Humour
A special issue of Cahiers victoriens et édouardiens, 96 (2022)
Deadline for abstracts: 30 October 2020

https://journals.openedition.org/cve/?lang=en

In late Victorian satirical magazines, comedies and conversation, the New Woman was an inexhaustible source of fun. For the opponents of women’s emancipation, ridicule was a weapon, which could win them allies even among women. For the feminist writers, ridicule was a constant threat, which they usually negotiated by asserting their womanliness and inviting their readers to take their demands seriously.
Hence, the woman’s rights woman was constantly criticized for her total absence of humour. “For the New Woman there is no such thing as a joke”, Ouida wrote in 1894. A year later, Hugh Stutfield commented in his antifeminist essay “Tommyrotics” that there was “no place left for humour” in New Woman novels: her fiction was spoiled by excessive realism, ponderous didacticism and a tendency to take things much too seriously.
As a target of satire and a comic victim, the New Woman quickly learnt how to put humour to her own use. By being funny, she made herself more pleasant to male readers and more tolerant of them. Ella Hepworth Dixon’s _My Flirtations_ (1892), originally published anonymously in the _Lady’s Pictorial_, was considered by the _Saturday Review_ as one of the most amusing books we have come across for a long time” (qtd in Fehlbaum 189). Even in her more pessimistic _The Story of a Modern Woman_ (1894), Dixon’s emancipated female protagonist maintains that a sense of humour is “what women ought to cultivate above all things” (chapter IV). In the New Woman’s satires of patriarchal thinking and male self-sufficiency, wit does have an instructive, “serious” function. Epigrammatic dialogues feature prominently in the novels and short stories of Sarah Grand and Mona Caird, as well as in their militant periodical essays which employ humour and irony to turn the tables on male critics. Irony, parody and comical reversals, in fiction and non-fiction alike, were among what Ann Heilmann has described as the New Woman’s “indirect strategies”.
In the twentieth century, the suffragettes’ methods were regularly described in the press as hysterical and not worth serious consideration. However, if we are to believe the American actress and feminist writer Elizabeth Robins, by the time the suffragists hardened their strategies in the early twentieth century, they had learnt how to use publicity, repartee and humorous effects to their advantage. In her comedy _Votes for Women_ (1909), the suffragettes’ public demonstrations are considered “excellent Sunday entertainment”. “[R]idicule crumples a man up”, their sharp-witted public speaker exclaims, “It steels a woman. We’ve educated ourselves so that we welcome ridicule.” (II, 1) Negotiating laughter has become integrated into the New Woman’s political apprenticeship.
Going counter to the perception of the New Woman’s humorlessness, this collection of essays will examine the rich and contradictory ways in which laughter, jokes, satire and comedy were deployed and reconfigured by New Women around the English-speaking world. It will engage with the political uses of humour, as it creates and invites distance. It will consider humorous practises as a source of empowerment: the use of comedy to destabilize power relations and to create a sense of shared enjoyment, community, and sisterhood. How did humour become integrated into feminist rhetorical practices? To what extent is it possible to speak of feminist humour?
While we will consider proposals on the New Woman as a target of satire, we would like to focus more specifically on her own capacity to respond to humour, to take a humorous distance and use laughter to her own ends. We invite contributions on the politics and poetics of humour and the use of irony. We will consider essays on the New Woman in the Victorian press, the visual arts, fiction, poetry and drama, as well as in autobiographies, memoirs and correspondence. We also welcome papers on Neo-Victorian rewritings of New Woman fiction in novels or graphic novels.
The essays will be published in Spring 2022 in the double-blind, peer-reviewed, open-edition French journal of Victorian studies _Cahiers victoriens et édouardiens_ (https://journals.openedition.org/cve/?lang=en)
Please send proposals (300 words) with a short biographical note by October 30, 2020 to Catherine Delyfer (catherine.delyfer [at] univ-tlse2.fr) and Nathalie Saudo-Welby (nsaudo [at] hotmail.com). Notifications of acceptance will be sent by November 30, 2020. Full articles will be due by June 1st, 2021.

Selective Bibliography

  • Barreca, Regina. They Used to Call Me Snow White… But I Drifted: Women’s Strategic Use of Humor. Penguin: Harmondsworth, 1991.
  • Blanch, Sophie. “Women and Comedy” in Joannou, M. ed. The History of British Women’s Writing 1920-1945, Palgrave Macmillan 2013, p. 112-128.
  • Chothia, Jean, éd. The New Woman and Other Emancipated Woman Plays. Oxford: OUP, 1998.
  • Cixous, Hélène. Le Rire de la Méduse et autres ironies. Paris : Galilée, 2010.
  • Fehlbaum, Valerie. “Ella Heptworth Dixon’s My Flirtations: The New Woman and the Marriage Market.” Victorian Review 44.2 (2018): 189-192.
  • Fuchs Abrams, Sabrina. Transgressive Humor of American Women Writers. Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Heilmann, Ann. New Woman Strategies: Sarah Grand, Olive Schreiner, Mona Caird. Manchester: Manchester UP, 2004.
  • Horlacher, Stefan. “A Short Introduction to Theories of Humour, the Comic, and Laughter”, Gender and Laughter (2009): 17-47.
  • Kohlke, Marie-Luise and Gutleben, Christian. Neo-Victorian Humour: Comic Subversions and Unlaughter in Contemporary Historical Revisions. Amsterdam: Brill Rodopi, 2017.
  • Kranidis, Rita S. Subversive Discourse: The Cultural Production of Late Victorian Feminist Novels. New-York: St Martin’s, 1995.
  • Ledger, Sally. The New Woman: Fiction and Feminism at the fin de siècle. Manchester: Manchester UP, 1997.
  • Little, Judy. Comedy and the Woman Writer: Woolf, Spark and Feminism. Lincoln/London: U of Nebraska Press.
  • Mangum, Teresa. Married, Middlebrow, and Militant: Sarah Grand and the New Woman Novel. Ann Arbor: U of Michigan Press, 1998.
  • Marks, Patricia. Bicycles, Bangs, and Bloomers: The New Woman in the Popular Press. Lexington: UP of Kentucky, 1990.
  • Moers, Ellen. Literary Women. Londres: Women’s Press, 1978.
  • Stetz, Margaret Dina. British Women’s Comic Fiction 1890-1990. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2001.

(posted 20 May 2020)


Going Viral: Chronotopes of Disaster in Film and Visual Media
EJES, Volume 26 (2022)
Deadline for proposals: 30 November 2020

The editors of EJES are issuing calls for papers for the three issues of the journal to be published in 2022.

Guest editors: Sotirios Bampatzimopoulos (Ankara University) and Geli Mademli (University of Amsterdam)

In her seminal text Illness as Metaphor (1978), Susan Sontag approaches the discourses around contagious diseases as systems of power and control over civil disobedience and difference. The text poignantly foreshadows the “treatment” of the HIV outbreak by Western public health providers and in the cultural imagination alike. The recent outbreak of the coronavirus around the world prompts us to revisit Sontag’s suggestion in the context of the expanding global crisis. In globalized media, a universally perceptible iconography of catastrophe and annihilation is constantly (re)produced. However, narratives of contamination and epidemics in film and television have been flourishing in the past two decades. It is in these times that we consider it essential to examine these narratives, as they offer a vital space to reflect on the (post-)human, on conflicting modes of physical and virtual interaction, the permeability of all physical borders, the normalization of bodily vulnerability, the legitimization of authoritarian politics in states of emergency, and the biopolitical use of science and technology.

Surprisingly, there has been very little research in English Studies on the audiovisual experience of the “virus” as a laboratory for our perception of disorder. Implementing mechanisms of empathy, testing the pandemic effect of synaesthesia, and constantly challenging the way we make meaning through our encounter with crisis landscape, cinema, TV series, virtual reality films or even video art and net.art construct what Luciana Parisi defines as an architecture of infection: “an experiential mutation between the abstract and the concrete.” At the same time, the multiplicity of these audiovisual narratives and our overexposure to them create a chaotic, nondirectional effect where meaning is contaminated and the medium becomes a “pharmakon” (Derrida): a poison that contains the cure, a critical tool for dissecting virus as a language (to reverse William Burroughs’s famous quote). Understanding virus as a complex system and addressing the need to explore its mechanisms in the language of visual media, we invite contributors from across Europe to submit papers related to the representation of virus in contemporary cinema and visual media in all its possible facets. Research can touch upon, yet is not limited to, one of the following topics:

  • Experiencing the post-human / Designing the post-social
  • Gamification of disaster
  • Overexposure to crisis (in Europe and beyond)
  • Disease and Public Space: sharing an environment of emergency
  • Trauma and victimhood
  • Gendered “troubles”
  • Contagiousness of representation
  • Viral hypes
  • Damage and error as an emotion (or affect)

Detailed proposals (up to 1,000 words) for full essays (7,500 words), as well as a short biography (max. 100 words) should be sent to the editors by 30 November 2020: Sotirios Bampatzimopoulos (sotirios@ankara.edu.tr) and Geli Mademli (geli.mademli@gmail.com).

Potential contributors are reminded that EJES operates a two-stage review process. The first is based on the submission of detailed proposals (up to 1,000 words) and results in invitations to submit full essays from which a final selection is then made. The deadline for essay proposals for this volume is 30 November 2020, with delivery of completed essays in the spring of 2021 and publication in Volume 26 (2022).Procedure
EJES operates a two-stage review process.

  1. Contributors are invited to submit proposals for essays on the topic in question by 30 November 2020.
  2. Following review of the proposals by the editorial board panel, informed by external specialists as appropriate, the guest editors will invite the authors of short-listed proposals to submit full-length essays for review with a spring 2021 deadline.
  3. The full-length essays undergo another round of review, and a final selection as well as suggestions for revisions are made. Selected essays are then revised and resubmitted to the guest editors in late 2021 for publication in 2022.

EJES employs Chicago Style (T&F Chicago AD) and British English conventions for spelling.

(posted 8 May 2020)


Victorian Materialisms
EJES, Volume 26 (2022)
Deadline for proposals: 30 November 2020

The editors of EJES are issuing calls for papers for the three issues of the journal to be published in 2022.

Guest editors: Ursula Kluwick (University of Bern), Ariane de Waal (MLU Halle-Wittenberg)

Matter ineluctably matters; it composes, decomposes, and recomposes the bodies and environments we inhabit. New materialist ideas surrounding the vitality (Jane Bennett), sympoeisis (Donna Haraway), and intra-actions (Karen Barad) of matter have paved intriguing pathways for literary and cultural analysis. Yet the notion that matter is in motion, rather than inert, and that humans are entangled in dense webs of responsive and partly also agential materials is not a new one. Victorian microscopists, chemists, botanists, physicists, geologists, physiologists, and novelists diligently dissected the material structures of chemical substances, plants, animals, atoms, subterranean strata, and human bodies. In the process, they not only developed precise tools and terminologies to quantify and describe matter, but concomitantly questioned the taxonomies that differentiated human from nonhuman entities.
Victorian scholars have responded productively to the new materialist turn. Yet in the wake of Asa Brigg’s influential Victorian Things (1988), studies have tended to maintain an ontological distinction between Victorian ‘people’ and ‘things.’ While there is a wealth of scholarship on even the most inconspicuous Victorian objects, and while virtually all human body parts and organs have come under critical scrutiny, the co-constitution of human and nonhuman materials remains somewhat underexplored. However, as this special issue argues, Victorian interrogations of the boundaries between human and nonhuman as well as active
and passive matter anticipate new materialist approaches. Hence, they invite us to reconsider relationships between nineteenth-century and contemporary conceptualisations of materiality.
This special issue has two objectives: first, it aims to investigate a broad array of Victorian materialities, with a special focus on the conceptual and physical entanglements between human, animal, plant, chemical, biotic, and inorganic matter in scientific, popular, and literary texts. Second, the issue seeks to trace continuities and intersections between Victorian and new materialisms while also exploring critical avenues that this dialogue might generate within the wider field of English Studies.
The editors invite proposals that examine the non/human materialities of Victorian literature, photography, art, or artefacts from matter-oriented perspectives alongside theoretical-methodological discussions of Victorian materialisms. Approaches that question and expand the conventional rubrics of Victorian Studies are especially welcome. Potential topics could include yet are not limited to the following areas:

  • NATURAL HISTORY: overlapping taxonomies of plant/animal/human species; vitalism;
  • THE ENVIRONMENT: matter in Victorian ecology and energy science; non/human response-abilities; thinking beyond anthropocentrism;
  • MEDICINE: anatomical, pathological, and healthy matter and its motions; the interplay of human and nonhuman microorganisms and parasites;
  • CHEMISTRY: interactions between chemical and literary/poetic transformations of matter;
  • PHYSICS: the physics of matter and the “physics of character” (Brilmyer 2015);
  • AESTHETICS: representations of material assemblages and the vibrancy of matter; specific literary modes and representational strategies for the expression of material agency.

Detailed proposals (up to 1,000 words) for full essays (7,500 words), as well as a short biography (max. 100 words) should be sent to the editors by 30 November 2020: Ursula Kluwick (ursula.kluwick@ens.unibe.ch), Ariane de Waal (ariane.de-waal@anglistik.uni-halle.de)

Potential contributors are reminded that EJES operates a two-stage review process. The first is based on the submission of detailed proposals (up to 1,000 words) and results in invitations to submit full essays from which a final selection is then made. The deadline for proposals for this volume is 30 November 2020, with delivery of completed essays in the spring of 2021 and publication in Volume 26 (2022).
Procedure
EJES operates a two-stage review process.

  1. Contributors are invited to submit proposals for essays on the topic in question by 30 November 2020.
  2. Following review of the proposals by the editorial board panel, informed by external specialists as appropriate, the guest editors will invite the authors of short-listed proposals to submit full-length essays for review with a spring 2021 deadline.
  3. The full-length essays undergo another round of review, and a final selection as well as suggestions for revisions are made. Selected essays are then revised and resubmitted to the guest editors in late 2021 for publication in 2022.

EJES employs Chicago Style (T&F Chicago AD) and British English conventions for spelling.

(posted 8 May 2020)


Patriarchal backlashes to feminism in times of crisis
EJES, Volume 26 (2022)
Deadline for proposals: 30 November 2020

The editors of EJES are issuing calls for papers for the three issues of the journal to be published in 2022.

Guest editors: Florence Binard (University of Paris) and Renate Haas (University of Kiel)

Plus ça change, moins ça change.”

Susan Faludi’s bestseller Backlash was first published in 1991, nearly 30 years ago, and yet its message seems to resonate more clearly than ever. It highlighted the pervasive and prevalent reaction of patriarchy (defined broadly as a system of society based on male domination) to the advance of women’s rights. Faludi analysed glossy magazines, movies, TV programmes, the New Right’s war on women, and the neofeminist stance as well as “polished” political discourse and showed that whatever the medium/organ/channel, women from all walks of life were openly or insidiously coaxed and cajoled into fulfilling their so-called natural role as homemakers.
Since then, new technologies and their channels of dissemination have proven to be useful tools for women and feminists to spread their views. But these means of communication are also the vehicles for antifeminist propaganda which is damaging to women’s rights. The achievements of the past are under threat in a growing number of countries if they have not already been reversed. This includes the right to contraception, abortion, education, work, etc. “Freedom of” and “freedom to” remain never-ending battles for women all over the world.
This special issue asks what has happened in Europe between the publication of Faludi’s book and the present in terms of backlash.
Researchers from the different parts of Europe and all disciplines included in ESSE are invited to submit essay proposals. Some of the topics might include:

  • Identifying “true” feminist politics in contemporary society
  • Universal rights versus group rights
  • Accusations of cultural appropriation/state multiculturalism vs women’s rights
  • Untruths used and abused in the current social discourse
  • Visual discourse in advertisement
  • Anti-feminist governmental practices
  • Internet trolls

Detailed proposals (up to 1,000 words) for full essays (7,500 words), as well as a short biography (max. 100 words) should be sent to the editors by 30 November 2020: Florence Binard (fbinard@eila.univ-paris-diderot.fr) and Renate Haas (haas@anglistik.uni-kiel.de).

Potential contributors are reminded that EJES operates a two-stage review process. The first is based on the submission of detailed proposals (up to 1,000 words) and results in invitations to submit full essays from which a final selection is then made. The deadline for essay proposals for this volume is 30 November 2020, with delivery of completed essays in the spring of 2021 and publication in Volume 26 (2022).
Procedure
EJES operates a two-stage review process.

  1. Contributors are invited to submit proposals for essays on the topic in question by 30 November 2020.
  2. Following review of the proposals by the editorial board panel, informed by external specialists as appropriate, the guest editors will invite the authors of short-listed proposals to submit full-length essays for review with a spring 2021 deadline.
  3. The full-length essays undergo another round of review, and a final selection as well as suggestions for revisions are made. Selected essays are then revised and resubmitted to the guest editors in late 2021 for publication in 2022.

EJES employs Chicago Style (T&F Chicago AD) and British English conventions for spelling.

(posted 8 May 2020)


A Tribute to Derek Walcott
An edited book
Deadline for proposals: 15 December 2020

Helen Goethals and Eric Doumerc of the University of Toulouse – Jean Jaurès are putting together a Tribute to Derek Walcott, to be published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing. All forms of tribute —critical essays, memoirs, and creative work— are welcome, and on any aspect of Derek Walcott’s life and work. Contributions should be no longer than 6000 words. Previously published work may be used, but if this is the case, evidence must be provided that permission to be republish has been granted.

More information can be found:
at http://www.cambridgescholars.com/t/EditedCollectionsLiterature
and from helen.goethals@univ-tlse2.fr

Abstract
Coming some three years after the death of Nobel prize-winning poet, playwright, teacher and painter, this book is intended as a Tribute to Derek Walcott (1930-2017). The editors welcome all forms of tribute —critical essays, memoirs, and creative work— addressing any aspect of Derek Walcott’s life and work.

About the Editors
Helen Goethals is professor of Commonwealth Studies at the University of Toulouse. A member of the CAS research centre and an associate member of the Critical Geographies research team, she has written extensively on the relationship between poetry and politics. She edited the Caribbean section of the Special Double issue of Poetry International featuring English language poetry from around the world.
Eric Doumerc is Assistant Professor of Caribbean Studies at the University of Toulouse. His research interests include Caribbean poetry, music, and the Caribbean oral tradition.His recent publications include Celebrate Wha’: Ten Black British Poets from the Midlands (Middelesbrough : Smokestack Books, 2011), an anthology which he co-edited with the poet Roy McFarlane and  Dub Poets in Their Own Words (APS Publications, 2017), a collection of interviews with dub poets in England, Jamaica and the USA.

Keywords 
Derek Walcott; Caribbean; Poetry; Drama; Watercolour;  Essay; Memoir; Homage

(posted 29 May 2020)