Books and special issues of journals – Deadlines January-March 2018

Industrial Heritage in the UK : Mutations, Conversions and Representations
Contributions are invited to an issue of LISA e-journal
Deadline for proposals: 1 March 2018

https://lisa.revues.org/9025

Since the mid-1950s, the UK has witnessed a growing interest in the study, protection and conservation of industrial heritage, and is often considered as a leader in the exploration of the significance and potentialities of such historical remains. This rise in public awareness was accompanied by the development of industrial archaeology as a discipline in its own right, which later led to industrial heritage being seen as a resource for regeneration and for a global reflexion on the protection of memories of the collective past. The discovery of the economic and social potential of derelict buildings has gone hand in hand with the development of (living) museums, with a surge in urban renewal policies in the context of deindustrialization and with preoccupations with sustainable development or green tourism.

This LISA e-journal issue will thus focus on industrial infrastructures such as former textile mills, factories or warehouses – whether listed or not – along with their surroundings when they constitute a landscape and/or are integrated into a conservation area. The palimpsestic quality of this industrial past is integral to popular and collective memories that are kept alive through museum initiatives whether in the private, public or charitable sectors but also through fictional or documentary films, web sites or the social media. Nostalgia for a glorious past era of British history contributes to the desire to preserve and celebrate the unique skills, the impressive know-how and more generally the salient traits of a bygone civilization.

We welcome contributions aiming to explore changes in the field of industrial heritage and industrial conservation and their instrumental role in the provision of spaces for tourism, culture, and urban regeneration, while bearing in mind the potential conflicts arising from the relationship between these various processes. Examining representations of industrial society and the tangible traces of industry in order to foreground mutations in how industrial heritage has been depicted and perceived since the beginning of the industrial revolution thus offers a more comprehensive picture of the contrasting visions of a once neglected heritage.

The perspective chosen for this Revue LISA / LISA e-journal issue is inter- and pluri-disciplinary, articulated around a variety of approaches including cultural geography, cultural history, art history, media studies, urban studies, heritage studies, architecture, etc.. Studies offering comparisons between the UK and other geographical area(s) or country/ies, are also welcome.

Possible themes thus include (but are not limited to):

  • Care of industrial and technical collections, the conservation of industrial artefacts.
  • Representations of a vanishing industrial society and its heritage: depicting the industrial past, its people and its physical reminders in urban and rural landscapes.
  • Memorizing the industrial past: educational projects, social media, TV or cinematic fictions or documentaries, festivals, attractions, museum developments, memorabilia…
  • Industrial ruins and post-industrial landscapes: creative acts inspired by engagements with physical testimonies to the past, their otherness and unstable state.
  • Recycling industrial buildings and their immediate environment through culture and heritage.
  • New functions for vacant industrial buildings: the discourse of sustainable urban development or of imaginative regeneration of derelict or unused sites.
  • Reinterpreting industrial sites for creative uses: questioning the inventiveness, viability and durability of adaptive re-use by such projects.
  • Conservation and conversions: conflicts arising between architectural, cultural, historical, economic and promotional priorities.
  • The contribution of industrial heritage to tourism and employment in post-industrial areas.
  • Industrial heritage/past as an inspiration for fashion, design, decoration or life style …

Proposals (abstract and bio, not exceeding 500 words) should be sent to Aurore Caignet, Renée Dickason and Tim Edensor by 1st March 2018. The deadline for completed articles is 1st October 2018.
Contributions should not exceed 6,000 words in length and should be sent together with a short biography of the author (max. 200 words) and an abstract (max. 300 words). For submissions, you are invited to read and follow the norms for presentation indicated on the peer-reviewed Revue LISA / LISA e-journal website https://lisa.revues.org/159
ISSN: 1762-6153, Presses Universitaires de Rennes, Revues.org.

(posted 8 July 2017)