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Book announcement:

Jean-Michel Ganteau, Christine Reynier and Isabelle Brasme (eds.), The Humble in 19th- to 21st-Century British Literature and Arts

 

Description: Through its take on ‘the humble’, this volume attempts to reveal the depth and philosophical relevance of literature, its ethical and political dimension as well as its connection to life. Because it can be associated with social class, religion, psychology or ethics, the notion of ‘the humble’ lends itself to diverse types of studies. The papers collected in this volume argue that in the course of the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, artists and writers have revisited the term ‘humble’ and, far from treating it as a simple motif, have raised it to the status of an aesthetic category. This category can first foster a better understanding of fiction, poetry, painting, and their representation of precarious lives through various genres and modes. It may also draw attention to neglected or depreciated humble novels or art forms that developed from the Victorian to the contemporary period, through the Edwardian and the modernist eras. Finally, it helps revise assumptions about the literature and art of the period and signals to a poetics of the humble. The works of art examined here explore the humble as a possible capacity and ethical force, a way of being and acting.

Contents:

Introduction: Isabelle Brasme, Jean-Michel Ganteau, Christine Reynier

Humble Art Forms

  • Laurence Roussillon-Constant: Artful Humility: A Pre-Raphaelite Ideal?
  • Sophie Aymes: Autographic Wood Engraving: Modernist D. I. Y.
  • Claudia Tobin: ‘The Humbleness of all his Objects’: Cézanne, Still Life, and Modern Writers

Aestheticizing Religious Humility

  • Stéphane Sitayeb: From Humbleness to Humiliation: Physical Losses and Spiritual Gains in The Hill of Dreams, by Arthur Machen
  • Shirley Bricout: The Humble Touch of the Good Samaritan in D.H. Lawrence’s Aaron’s Rod
  • José Mari Yebra: The Humble Side of Motherhood in Colm Tóibín’s The Testament of Mary

Gendering the Humble

  • Barbara Puschmann-Nalenz: The Humble, Gender and the Local in Recent British and Irish Narratives
  • Susana Onega: Lesbian Invisibility and the Politics of Representation of the Lady and the Humble Servant in Sarah Waters’ Affinity

Precariousness

  • Angela Locatelli: ‘The Humble/d’ in Literature and Philosophy: Precariousness, Vulnerability, and the Pragmatics of Social Visibility
  • Corina Stan: A Ship of Fools: Precarious Lives in 1660s / 1980s England
  • Silvia Pellicer-Orti : Writing and Loving: Strategies to Overcome Humbleness in Lynne Reid Banks’ Children at the Gate

Self-effacement

  • Pascale Tollance:  From Humiliation to Humility: Swift’s Aesth/et(h)ics of Self-Effacement in The Light of Day
  • Xavier LeBrun: Leaving Jacob Room: Narratorial Humility in Jacob’s Room
  • Aude Haffen: “In a tactful, impersonal way, we have become quite intimate”: Christopher Isherwood’s Humble Persona and Inoperative Narratives in Goodbye to Berlin (1939)
  • Adeline Arniac: ‘We can’t start again. We can end again.’ Humble Inchoation in a Selection from Harold Pinter’s Memory Plays

The British Humble Abroad 

  • Leila Haghshenas: The Aesthetics of Humility in Leonard Woolf’s The Village in the Jungle
  • Laurent Mellet: The British Humble Abroad: Humanism in Practice in E. M. Forster’s First Novel (Where Angels Fear to Tread) and Jonathan Coe’s Latest (Expo 58)

Further details: https://www.pulm.fr/index.php/9782367812489.html

Gender Studies Network: CFPs of particular relevance

LondonIsOpen: London as a Cosmopolitan City in Contemporary Culture
Nr 20 of Other Modernities, November 2018
Deadline for proposals: 15 October 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/books-journals-2017-10-12/#LondonIsOpen

Contemporary Victoriana: Victorian literature and Popular and Material cultures
Centre universitaire de Troyes, University of Reims, France, 16 March 2018
New extended deadline for proposals: 20 October 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1803/#victoriana

Museums in literature – Literature in museums
A forthcoming issue of Journal MuseumEdu
Deadline for proposals: 31 October 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/books-journals-2017-10-12/#museum

(Im)possible Worlds
Journal of Philology and Intercultural Communication
Deadline for proposals: 1 November 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/books-journals-2017-10-12/

Modernist Objects
Paris Sorbonne University (VALE EA 4085), France, 13-16 June 2018
Deadline for proposals: 15 November 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1806/

Female suffrage in British art, literature and history
University of Toulouse, France, 24-25 May 2018
Deadline for proposals: 20 December 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1805/#female_suffrage

Transfigured Voices: Vocal disorders, disruptions and impersonations
University of Caen Normandie, France, 17-18 May 2018
Deadline for proposals: 15 January 2018
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1805/#voices

Katherine Mansfield: New Directions
Birkbeck, University of London, UK, 28-29 June 2018
Deadline for proposals: 1 February 2018
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1806/#KM

Crime Fiction: Insiders and Outsiders. Captivating Criminality 5
Corsham Court, Bath Spa University, UK, 28-30 June 2018
Deadline for proposals: 3 February 2018
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1806/

Romantic E-Scapes: Popular Romance in the Digital Age
University of the Balearic Islands, Spain, 9-11 July 2018
Deadline for proposal: 28 February 2018
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1807/

War and Peace: Victorian Popular Fiction Association’s 10th Annual Conference
Institute of English Studies, Senate House, London, UK, 3-7 July 2018
Deadline for proposls: 2 March 2018
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1807/#war_and_peace

CFP for The Nordic Journal of English Studies

The Nordic Journal of English Studies (NJES) is an international journal publishing articles in the field of English literature and linguistics. Although an important aim of the journal is to promote the field of English studies in the Nordic countries, it publishes articles from international scholars both within and outside Europe. All scholars working within the field of English literature and linguistics are thus welcome to make submissions. New PhDs and PhD candidates are particularly encouraged to submit their work. NJES also publishes special issues focused on a particular theme in English language and literature. The journal is peer-reviewed and listed in the MLA, EBSCO and ERIH databases.

To submit your article or for more information please contact us by email at nordic.journal@sprak.gu.se .

Deadline for submissions: 1 March  2018.

See also the journal’s home page http://ojs.ub.gu.se/ojs/index.php/njes.”

Book Announcement: Interweaving Myths in Shakespeare and his Contemporaries

Interweaving Myths in Shakespeare and his contemporaries, ed. Janice Valls-Russell, Agnès Lafont & Charlotte Coffin

Manchester University Press, 2017

304 pages, ISBN: 978-1-5261-1768-7

DESCRIPTION: This volume proposes new insights into the uses of classical mythology by Shakespeare and his contemporaries, focusing on interweaving processes in early modern appropriations of myth. Its 11 essays show how early modern writing intertwines diverse myths and plays with variant versions of individual myths that derive from multiple classical sources, as well as medieval, Tudor and early modern retellings and translations. Works discussed include poems and plays by William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe and others. Essays concentrate on specific plays including The Merchant of Venice and Dido, Queen of Carthage, tracing interactions between myths, chronicles, the Bible and contemporary genres. Mythological figures are considered to demonstrate how the weaving together of sources deconstructs gendered representations. New meanings emerge from these readings, which open up methodological perspectives on multi-textuality, artistic appropriation and cultural hybridity/

Contents

Introduction: ‘Ariachne’s broken woof’ – Janice Valls-Russell, Agnès Lafont and Charlotte Coffin

  1. Shakespeare’s mythological feuilletage: A methodological induction – Yves Peyré
  2. The non-Ovidian Elizabethan epyllion: Thomas Watson, Christopher Marlowe, Richard Barnfield – Tania Demetriou
  3. This realm is an empire’: Tales of origins in medieval and early modern France and England – Dominique Goy-Blanquet
  4. Trojan shadows in Shakespeare’s King John – Janice Valls-Russell
  5. Venetian Jasons, parti-coloured lambs and a tainted wether: Ovine tropes and the Golden Fleece in The Merchant of Venice – Atsuhiko Hirota
  6. Fifty ways to kill your brother: Medea and the poetics of fratricide in early modern English literature – Katherine Heavey
  7. ‘She, whom Jove transported into Crete’: Europa, between consent and rape – Gaëlle Ginestet
  8. Subtle weavers, mythological interweavings and feminine political agency: Penelope and Arachne in early modern drama – Nathalie Rivère de Carles
  9. Multi-layered conversations in Marlowe’s Dido, Queen of Carthage – Agnès Lafont
  10. Burlesque or neoplatonic? Popular or elite? The shifting value of classical mythology in Love’s Mistress– Charlotte Coffin
  11. Pygmalion, once and future myth: Instead of a conclusion – Ruth Morse

Index

Details: http://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/9781526117687/

Editors

  • Janice Valls-Russell is employed by the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) at Université Paul-Valéry, Montpellier, France, where she coordinates early modern research projects
  • Agnès Lafont is Senior Lecturer in Early Modern English Literature at Université Paul Valéry, Montpellier, France
  • Charlotte Coffin is Senior Lecturer in Early Modern English Literature at Université Paris-Est Créteil Val de Marne, France

Book Announcement: Empires and Revolutions

Empires and Revolutions: Cunninghame Graham and his Contemporaries, edited by Carla Sassi and Silke Stroh

Glasgow: Scottish Literature International, August 2017

ISBN 978-1-908980-25-0

192 pages
Paperback
£ 12.95  /  € 17.95  /  $ 19.95

The European age of empires launched a process of capitalist globalisation that continues to the present day. It is also inextricably linked with the spread of revolutionary discourses, in terms of race, nation, or social class: the quest for emancipation, political independence, and economic equality. Robert Bontine Cunninghame Graham (1852–1936), in both his life and his oeuvre, most effectively represents the complex interaction between imperial and revolutionary discourses in this dramatic period. Throughout his life he was an outspoken critic of injustice and inequality, and his appreciation of the demands and customs of diverse territories and contrasting cultures were hallmarks of his life, his political ideas, and his writing. These essays explore the expression of these ideas in the works of Cunninghame Graham and of other Scottish writers of the period.

Contents

  • Introduction (by Carla Sassi & Silke Stroh)
  • Chapter 1: R. B. Cunninghame Graham: Janiform Genius (by Cedric Watts)
  • Chapter 2: The Local and the Global: The Multiple Contexts of Cunninghame Graham
    (by John M. MacKenzie)
  • Chapter 3: Anti-Slavery Discourse in Three Adventure Stories by R. M. Ballantyne
    (by Jochen Petzold)
  • Chapter 4: Don Roberto on Doughty Deeds; or, Slavery and Family History in the Scottish Renaissance
    (by Michael Morris)
  • Chapter 5: Empire and Globalisation in John Francis Campbell’s My Circular Notes
    (by Jessica Homberg-Schramm)
  • Chapter 6: Nineteenth-Century Argentine Literature and the Writings of R. B. Cunninghame Graham
    (by Richard Niland)
  • Chapter 7: R. B. Cunninghame Graham and the Argentinean Angelito (by Jennifer Hayward)
  • Chapter 8: Opposing Racism and Imperialism: Isabella Fyvie Mayo’s search for literary space(s), 1880–1914 (by Lindy Moore)
  • Chapter 9: The Empire in Cunninghame Graham’s Parliamentary Speeches and Early Writings, 1885–1900 (by Lachlan Munro)
  • Chapter 10: White-Skinned Barbarians in Selected Tales by R. B. Cunninghame Graham
    (by John C. McIntyre)
  • Chapter 11: Violet Jacob on Capital Relation: Local and Global Flows of Privilege and (Im)mobility
    (by Arianna Introna)

Editors

  • Carla Sassi is Associate Professor of English Literature at the University of Verona
  • Silke Stroh is a lecturer in anglophone literature and cultural studies at Muenster University, Germany

Online information

http://asls.arts.gla.ac.uk/Empires_and_Revolutions.html

Book Announcement: Handbook of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology

Hubert Zapf (ed.), Handbook of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology

HEAS Volume 2

2016, 725 pages
Special Offer of €49,95 (regular price € 199,95)

Ecocriticism has emerged as one of the most fascinating and rapidly growing fields of recent literary and cultural studies. From its regional origins in late-twentieth-century Anglo-American academia, it has become a worldwide phenomenon, which involves a decidedly transdisciplinary and transnational paradigm that promises to return a new sense of relevance to research and teaching in the humanities. A distinctive feature of the present handbook in comparison with other survey volumes is the combination of ecocriticism with cultural ecology, reflecting an emphasis on the cultural transformation of ecological processes and on the crucial role of literature, art, and other forms of cultural creativity for the evolution of societies towards sustainable futures. In state-of-the-art contributions by leading international scholars in the field, this handbook maps some of the most important developments in contemporary ecocritical thought. It introduces key theoretical concepts, issues, and directions of ecocriticism and cultural ecology and demonstrates their relevance for the analysis of texts and other cultural phenomena.

This is a special paperback offer for individual members of the ESSE, only. Valid until 15.10.2017.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/r8lz1ynkm7plg5z/HEAS%20PB%20FLYER_ESSE.pdf?dl=0

Book Announcement: Handbook of Intermediality

Gabriele Rippl (ed.), Handbook of Intermediality: Literature – Image – Sound – Music

HEAS Volume 1

2015, 701 pages
Special Offer €49,95 (regular price €199,95)

This handbook offers students and researchers compact orientation in their study of intermedial phenomena in Anglophone literary texts and cultures by introducing them to current academic debates, theoretical concepts and methodologies. By combining theory with text analysis and contextual anchoring, it introduces students and scholars alike to a vast field of research which encompasses concepts such as intermediality, multi- and plurimediality, intermedial reference, transmediality, ekphrasis, as well as related concepts such as visual culture, remediation, adaptation, and multimodality, which are all discussed in connection with literary examples. Hence each of the 30 contributions spans both a theoretical approach and concrete analysis of literary texts from different centuries and different Anglophone cultures.

This is a special paperback offer for individual members of the ESSE, only. Valid until 15.10.2017.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/r8lz1ynkm7plg5z/HEAS%20PB%20FLYER_ESSE.pdf?dl=0

Gender Studies Network: CFPs of particular relevance

Jane Austen Ours
The Winter 2017 issue of The ESSE Messenger
Deadline for proposals: 1 October 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/books-journals-2017-10-12/#Austen

“A Sudden Swift Impression”: Re-Examining the Victorian Short Story
University of Brighton, UK, 27 January 2018
Deadline for proposals: 2 October 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1801/#short_story

Urban Walking – The Flâneur as an Icon of Metropolitan Culture in Literature and Other Media
Jena, Germany, 9-10 March 2018
Deadline for propsals: 15 October 2018
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1803/#flaneur

Beyond Books and Plays. Cultures and Practices of Writing in Early Modern Theatre
Journal of Early Modern Studies, Volume 8, 2019
Deadline for proposals: 31 October 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/books-journals-2017-10-12/#JEMS

Staging motherhood and mothers in British drama across centuries
A thematic volume
Deadline for proposals: 1 November 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/books-journals-2017-10-12/#motherhood

Dissonance, eclecticism and the blurring of genres in the modern and contemporary culture of the English-speaking world
University of Reims-Champagne Ardenne (URCA), France, 13 April 2018
Deadline for proposals: 15 November 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1804/#dissonance

British Women and Parody
Amiens, France, 6 July 2018
Deadline for proposals: 17 December 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1807/

Book Announcement:

Laurent Curelly, An Anatomy of an English Radical Newspaper: The Moderate (1648-9)

Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2017

280 pages

This book explores the content of The Moderate, a radical newspaper of the British Civil Wars published in the pivotal years 1648-9. This newsbook, as newspapers were then known, is commonly associated with the Leveller movement, a radical political group that promoted a democratic form of government. While valuable studies have been published on the history of seventeenth-century English periodicals, as well as on the interaction between these newspapers and print culture at large, very little has been written on individual newspapers. This book fills a void: it provides an in-depth investigation of the news printed in The Moderate, with reference to other newspapers and to the larger historical context, and captures the essence of this periodical, seen both as a political publication and a commercial product. This book will be of interest to early-modern historians and literary scholars.

The Cambridge Scholars Publishing website makes it possible to view the first thirty pages of the book:
http://www.cambridgescholars.com/an-anatomy-of-an-english-radical-newspaper

Book Announcement: Spectacular Science, Technology and Superstition in the Age of Shakespeare

Spectacular Science, Technology and Superstition in the Age of Shakespeare, Sophie Chiari and Mickaël Popelard (eds.)

Edinburgh University Press, 2017

288 pages. ISBN (Hardback) : 9781474427814

Editors:

  • Sophie Chiari, Professor at Université Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
  • Mickaël Popelard, Associate Professor at Université de Basse-Normandie, Caen, France.

The volume explores the interaction between science, literature and spectacle in Shakespeare’s era.

To the readers who ask themselves: ‘What is science?’, this volume provides an answer from an early modern perspective, whereby science included such various intellectual pursuits as history, poetry, occultism and philosophy. By exploring particular aspects of Shakespearean drama, this collection illustrates how literature and science were inextricably linked in the early modern period. In order to bridge the gap between Renaissance literature and early modern science, the essays collected here focus on a complex intellectual territory situated at the point of juncture between humanism, natural magic and craftsmanship. It is argued that science and literature constantly interacted, thus revealing that what we now call ‘literature’ and what we choose to describe as ‘science’ were not clear-cut categories in Shakespeare’s days but rather a part of common intellectual territory.

Key Features

  • Analyses different aspects of Shakespeare’s plays through the prism of early modern science
  • Sheds fresh light on major works such as the Sonnets, Love’s Labour’s Lost, Romeo and Juliet, Twelfth Night, King Lear, Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, The Tempest, The Winter’s Tale
  • Combines theoretical views, historical approaches, and close readings
  • Offers an innovative dialectic vision of the Shakespeare/science nexus, taking up Mazzio’s seminal idea that it is now necessary to “move beyond forms of analysis focused largely on thematic traces of, or indeed linguistic reflections of, historically specific arenas of scientific practice”
  • Links science and spectacle and posits that early modern theatre fashioned the reception of early modern discoveries
  • Pays attention to systems of thought which bind together scientific and literary discourses, practices and mentalities within a single episteme (in Michel Foucault’s interpretation of the word)

ESSE Book Grants

Recognising that it is difficult in some situations to obtain access to books necessary for research without purchasing them, and recognising also that some ESSE members have financial difficulties, ESSE awards some small grants to its members for the purchase of books in connection with specific research projects.

Grants will be of a maximum of 300 euro per applicant. However, applications will be kept to the minimum necessary and restricted only to books that fulfil the following criteria:

  • Books that are not held by the applicant’s university libraries and cannot easily and quickly be obtained by interlibrary loan.
  • Books that need to be available to the applicants over an extended period, longer than would be possible through a library loan.
  • Books whose price would place a strain on the applicant’s available financial resources, for example, because of the high cost of the books concerned.

ESSE requests that successful applicants donate the books to their university libraries when their research projects have been completed, so that other scholars can benefit from the books.

Eligibility

  • Grants will be made only to members of ESSE, or to PhD students whose supervisors are members of ESSE.
  • Grants are available for any research project, whether it is formally registered and recognised or simply normal individual academic research. However, it is not the intention to provide books for general academic purposes, e.g. as reference works to have on one’s bookshelf.

Dates

The application deadline is 1 October 2017. Applications will be dealt with as quickly as possible.

Books included in the application must be bought at the personal expense of the applicant between the application deadline and 30 November 2017.

After purchasing the books, the winners will send the itemised receipts to the Treasurer of ESSE, Alberto Lázaro (alberto.lazaro@uah.es). The receipt(s) will include the name of the purchaser, the titles and the cost of the books (even if the purchases are electronic).

Grant money will be transferred to recipients’ accounts before 15 December 2017.

Selection Committee

Applications

Applications should be sent to the Chair of the Bursaries Committee using the form available here.

CFP for the Winter 2017 issue of the ESSE Messenger

The ESSE Messenger invites submissions for its Winter 2017 section of professional articles on the topic: Jane Austen Ours

2017 marks the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen’s death. What she left as her bequest to the world was to become a prolific space where sense, persuasion, sensibility and pride remained pre-eminent and where the Elinors, Mariannes, Janes, Elizabeths, Emmas, Darcys, Brandons, Willoughbys and Dashwoods still congregated together or at least briefly crossed each other’s paths. More than 200 years after their first publication, her novels are still avidly read as books and even transformed into successful film adaptations. In the 21st century her creations still provide a source of fascination and continue both to captivate well-seasoned readers and to animate fresh audiences. The questions that naturally arise are, then: Why are people still so obsessed with Jane Austen? Why is her legacy still alive and spreading? Is it because she has a sincere, direct, natural and convincing way of depicting human nature? Is it because her works are easily translated or adapted across various mediums, cultures and time periods? What is it that constitutes Jane Austen’s face in the 21st century? Questions such as these may help to suggest some of the topics for the Winter 2017 issue of the ESSE Messenger. Proposals should be submitted to the Editor by 1 October 2017.

Gender Studies Network: CFPs of particular relevance

The Hidden Faces of the Americas
Université Bretagne Sud, Lorient, France, 22-23 March 2018
Deadline for proposals: 6 September 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1803/#hidden_faces

(Re)Defining Gender in Early Modern British Drama (1550-1700): Power, Sexualities and Ideologies in Text and Performance (tentative title)
A collection of essays
Deadline for proposals: 15 September 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/books-journals-2017-07-09/#gender

Writing Romantic Lives: A One Day Postgraduate Symposium
Romanticism @ Edge Hill University & Keele University, UK, 25 November 2017
Deadline for proposals: 18 September 2017
http://essenglish.org/conf1711/

Precarity, Populism and Post-Truth Politics
Universidad de Córdoba, Spain, 1-3 February 2018
Deadline for proposals: 30 September 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1802/#populism

The Fantastic versus Realism and their relevance as literary conventions
Bialystok, Poland, 16-17 November 2017
Deadline for proposals: 30 September 2017
http://essenglish.org/conf1711/#fantastyka

War Memories: Celebrations, Reconstructions, Representations, War narratives in the English-speaking world (18th to the 21st century)
Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario, 12-14 June 2018
Deadline for proposals:  15 October 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1806/#war_narratives

Body, Voice and Language Learning in Higher Education
Volume 37 No 2 (June 2018) of the journal Researching and Teaching Languages for Specific Purposes
Deadline for proposals: 30 October 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/books-journals-2017-10-12/#APLIUT

The Transformative Power of the Arts in Victorian and Edwardian Culture and Society
Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, France, 2-3 March 2018
Deadline for proposals: 31 October 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1803/#SFEVE

British Jewish Contemporary Cultures: An International Conference
Bangor University, Wales, UK, 26-27 March 2018
Deadline for proposals: 1 December 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1803/

Stop news: A new picture has been added to the GSN Gallery.

 

Complimentary Book Sharing: Television and Serial Adaptation

During the month of July, Routledge is making the following book available for download in pdf format for free, as complimentary sharing on ReadCube platform: Television and Serial Adaptation, by Shannon Wells-Lassagne, Senior Lecturer at the University of Burgundy-Franche Comté in Dijon, France. This book was first published in 2017, ISBN:978-1-138-69635-8 (hbk); ISBN: 978-1-315-52453-5 (ebk).

http://www.readcube.com/articles/10.4324/9781315524535…

The book is part of the Routledge Advances in Television Studies series.

Details about the book here: http://essenglish.org/messenger/blog/book-announcement-television-and-serial-adaptation/

New book: Anglo Saxon Women: A Florilegium

Anglo-Saxon Women: A Florilegium, ed. by Emily Butler (John Carroll University), Irina Dumitrescu (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn) et Hilary E. Fox (Wayne State University).

This book is a collection of short, interpretive pieces (600-800 words) on a range of women in Anglo-Saxon England. These women include not only those long-recognized and studied, but those who occupy the background of texts. This florilegium of women from across the textual and material record reveals the obvious and obscure roles women played in Anglo-Saxon culture and their often overlooked presence in texts and art. The collection will be a resource for teachers to use in the classroom and for students to use while selecting research topics. It is also designed to be a pleasure to read, both for Anglo-Saxonists and for those curious about the field. This survey is intended to provide the editors with more data for placing the book with a suitable press.

In case you might be interested to use or recommend this book, could you please fill in the short questionnaire (only 4 questions) to be found at:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/F2373NM

Book Announcement: Male Voices on Women’s Rights: An Anthology of Nineteenth-Century British Texts

Martine Monacelli (ed.) Male Voices on Women’s Rights: An Anthology of Nineteenth-Century British Texts

Manchester University Press,

Published 1st Juily 2017

Male voices on women’s rights is a timely complement to the studies undertaken in recent years on men’s roles in the history of feminism.This unique collection of seminal, little-known or forgotten writings, spanning from 1809 to 1913, will help the revision of many common assumptions and misconceptions regarding male attitudes to sex equality, and give some insight into the tensions provoked by shifting patterns of masculinity and re-definitions of femininity. The documents, drawn from a wide range of sources, throw a light on the role played by the radical tradition, liberal culture, religious dissent and economic criticism in the development of women’s politics in nineteenthcentury Britain.
The collection includes a substantial historical introduction and a short contextualising essay before each excerpt, making it an accessible resource for students and teachers alike.

Martine Monacelli is Professor Emeritus at the University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, France.

CFP: Coils of the Serpent: Journal for the Study of Contemporary Power

Coils of the Serpent is a scholarly journal dedicated to the investigation of contemporary manifestations of power, launched in 2016. It is intended as an open-access platform on which diverse theories and analyses of power shall be developed, brought into dialogue with each other, discussed, criticized, illustrated and popularized. The orientation of the journal is interdisciplinary; it is conceived as a forum for a lively exchange of ideas and opinions between the fields of sociology, political science, philosophy, history, economics, literary, cultural and media studies, psychology, educational sciences, and others. The phenomenon of power is essentially tackled on three levels, which can be interwoven to varying degrees: on the level of theory, on the level of case studies (of concrete institutions, social practices, discourse formations, dispositifs, forms of subjectivation, spaces, etc.) and on the level of contributions dealing with cultural and artistic engagements with power.

Contributions addressing the issue on one or more of these levels are welcome from all the relevant disciplines. Besides the traditional essay, the journal also publishes more unconventional texts as well as shorter statements, discussions and commentaries. It publishes only original work and only manuscripts written in English. We also explicitly invite submissions that are not fully ‘rounded’ and ‘finished’ scientific pieces, but rather of a fragmentary, ‘work/thought-in-progress’ nature. Since Coils of the Serpent aims at reaching a wider readership than exists for academic writing, the texts submitted should aim at a certain degree of accessibility. All submissions will be peer-reviewed. We also invite proposals for thematic special issues.

To find out more, please go to: www.coilsoftheserpent.org

Manuscripts should be submitted to: submissions@coilsoftheserpent.org

CFP: The International Journal of James Bond Studies

The International Journal of James Bond Studies is an academic peer-reviewed journal dedicated to publishing interdisciplinary scholarship on all aspects of Ian Fleming’s James Bond franchise. The journal aims to develop contemporary critical readings of Ian Fleming’s James Bond across literary, filmic, and cultural history, and offers broader criticism of the popular appeal of Fleming’s creation and its relation to the spy genre. The journal will appeal to scholars, academics, and cultural critics whose work focuses on Ian Fleming and James Bond, as well as to fans of the James Bond franchise who wish to supplement their knowledge in this area.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • the James Bond novels (both original and continuation);
  • the James Bond films;
  • the music of James Bond;
  • James Bond computer games;
  • television, radio, and comic adaptations;
  • James Bond parodies and/or spin-offs;
  • James Bond merchandise;
  • the cultural impact of James Bond;
  • James Bond and spy fiction;
  • other academic works on James Bond.

Articles of 6,000-8,000 words and reviews of 2,000 words will be considered.

For full details on the style guide and journal conventions, please see our submissions page: http://jamesbondstudies.roehampton.ac.uk/about/submissions/

You can also connect with the International Journal of James Bond Studies on Facebook (@JamesBondStudies) and Twitter (@IJJBS)

Conference Report: Education and Cultural Heritage

“Education and Cultural Heritage” Conference

Brussels (Belgium), June 10, 2017

Marisa Kerbizi, “Alexander Moisiu” University of Durrës (Albania) and CEO of “Association of Heritage and Education”

Picture Gallery

“Education and Cultural Heritage” Conference was organized by Association of Heritage and Education in cooperation with Cultural Association Konitza, on June 10, 2017. The conference was hosted by Belgian-Italian Chamber of Commerce, Brussels, Belgium. Scholars from well known academic institutions and universities in the region took part in this conference; worthy to mention a few, La Sapienza University of Rome, Tirana University, “Alexander Moisiu” University, Ministry of Research Technology and Higher Education of Indonesia, Volgograd University, Danubius University of Galati, South-East European University, “Ismail Qemali” University, European University of Tirana,“Fan Noli” University but also Institute of National Economy Bucharest, FEDRA, Young Ambassadors Program Initiative, Centre for the Modern History Documentation of Volgograd Region, etc.

The conference featured a welcoming note by Counselor for Education, Associate Professor Pranvera Kamani, representative of Mission of Albania in EU. A very interesting speech was held by Ms.Amet Gjanaj, Deputy in Belgium Parliament. A Special Guest in ICECH Conference was Ms.Haxhi Bajraktari, Minister-Counselor in Embassy of Kosovo Republic in Brussels. Conference keynote speakers were Prof. Dr. Dhimitër Doka, Tirana University and Associate Professor PhD Gabriela Marchis, Danubius University of Galati, Romania.

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Book Announcement: War Memories – Commemoration, Recollections, and Writings on War

Stéphanie A.H. Bélanger and Renée Dickason (eds.), War Memories: Commemoration, Recollections, and Writings on War

McGill- Queen’s University Press 2017.

4489 pages
ISBN-10: 0773547932
ISBN-13: 978-0773547933

Shaping individual and collective war memories through the art of commemoration.

War Memories explores the patchwork formed by collective memory, public remembrance, private recollection, and the ways in which they form a complex composition of observations, initiatives, and experiences.

Offering an international perspective on war commemoration, contributors consider the process of assembling historical facts and subjective experiences to show how these points of view diverge according to various social, cultural, political, and historical perspectives. Encompassing the representations of wars in the English-speaking world over the last hundred years, this collection presents an extensive, yet integrated, reflection on various types of commemoration and interpretations of events. Essays respond to common questions regarding war memory: how and why do we remember war? What does commemoration tell us about the actors in wars? How does commemoration reflect contemporary society’s culture of war?

War Memories disseminates current knowledge on the performance, interpretation, and rewriting of facts and events during and after wars, while focusing on how patriotic fervour, resistance, conscientious objection, injury, trauma, and propaganda contribute to the shaping of individual and collective memory.

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Book Announcement: Elizabeth I’s Italian Letters

Carlo M. Bajetta (ed.), Elizabeth I’s Italian Letters

New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017

Hardcover and e-book: lxxvii + 285 pages
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; 1st ed. 2017
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1137442328
ISBN-13: 978-1137442321
Series: “Queenship and Power”

Contents 

Introduction (pp. xxi- lxxvii)
Letters 1-29 (pp. 1-250)
Appendix 1 [letter 30] (pp. 251-259)
Bibliography (pp. 261-275)
Index of names (pp. 277- 285)

With 9 illustrations from the original manuscripts

About the volume

This is the first edition ever of the Queen’s correspondence in Italian. These letters cast a new light on her talents as a linguist and provide interesting details as to her political agenda, and on the cultural milieu of her court. This book provides a fresh analysis of the surviving evidence concerning Elizabeth’s learning and use of Italian, and of the activity of the members of her ‘Foreign Office.’ All of the documents transcribed here are accompanied by a short introduction focusing on their content and context, a brief description of their transmission history, and an English translation.

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Book Announcement: Rewriting Shakespeare’s Plays For and By the Contemporary Stage

Michael Dobson and Estelle Rivier-Arnaud (eds.), Rewriting Shakespeare’s Plays For and By the Contemporary Stage

Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 1 June 2017. 195 pages

ISBN-10: 1443882801
ISBN-13: 978-1443882804

Why have contemporary playwrights been obsessed by Shakespeare’s plays to such an extent that most of the canon has been rewritten by one rising dramatist or another over the last half century? Among other key figures, Edward Bond, Heiner Müller, Carmelo Bene, Arnold Wesker, Tom Stoppard, Howard Barker, Botho Strauss, Tim Crouch, Bernard Marie Koltès, and Normand Chaurette have all put their radical originality into the service of adapting four-century-old classics. The resulting works provide food for thought on issues such as Shakespearean role-playing, narrative and structural re-shuffling. Across the world, new writers have questioned the political implications and cultural stakes of repeating Shakespeare with and without a difference, finding inspiration in their own national experiences and in the different ordeals they have undergone. How have our contemporaries carried out their rewritings, and with what aims? Can we still play Hamlet, for instance, as Dieter Lesage asks in his book bearing this title, or do we have to kill Shakespeare as Normand Chaurette implies in a work where his own creative process is detailed? What do these rewritings really share with their sources? Are they meaningful only because of Shakespeares shadow haunting them? Where do we draw the lines between interpretation, adaptation and rewriting? The contributors to this collection of essays examine modern rewritings of Shakespeare from both theoretical and pragmatic standpoints. Key questions include: can a rewriting be meaningful without the readers or spectators already knowing Shakespeare? Do modern rewritings supplant Shakespeares texts or curate them? Does the survival of Shakespeare in the theatrical repertory actually depend on the continued dramatization of our difficult encounters with these potentially obsolete scripts represented by rewriting? Continue reading “Book Announcement: Rewriting Shakespeare’s Plays For and By the Contemporary Stage”