All Blog Posts

Gender Studies Network: CFPs of particular relevance

Forster: Nature, Culture, Queer!
University of Education Ludwigsburg, Germany, 13-14 April 2018
Deadline for proposals: 1 December 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1804/

Migrant Narratives and the City
Budapest, Hungary, 27-28 April 2018
Deadline for proposals: 1 December 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1804/#migrants

Salaciousness, Licentiousness, and Promiscuity in Literature, Culture, and Law: 7th Symposium Opoliense
University of Opole, Poland, 10-11 May 2018
Deadline for proposals: 1 December 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1805/

The Second Annual Early Modern Women Writers’ Colloquium (2018)
Nicosia, Cyprus, 25-27 March 2018
Deadline for proposals: 1 December 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1803/

Abortion in the British Isles, France and North America since 1800
University of Paris-Sorbonne, France, 6-8 November 2018
Deadline for proposals: 1 December 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1811/

Nationalism and the Postcolonial
Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany, 10-12 May 2018
Deadline for proposals: 31 December 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1805/

Environment, Ecology, Climate and ‘Nature’ in 21st Century Scottish Literature
Special Issue of Humanities  (ISSN 2076-0787)
Deadline for proposals: 15 January 2018
http://essenglish.org/cfp/books-journals-2018-01-03/

Marx, Semiotics and Political Praxis
A special issue of Open Cultural Studies, De Gruyter Open
Deadline for porposals: 15 January 2018
http://essenglish.org/cfp/books-journals-2018-01-03/#Marx

Sarah Hall: A Two-Day International Conference
University of Leuven, Belgium, 16-17 May 2018
Deadline for proposals: 19 January 2018
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1805/

From Tokens of Love to Archived Relics: Private Life and Material Culture in Indian Ocean Societies
University of Reunion Island, France, 21-22 November 2018
Deadline for proposals: 30 January 2018
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1811/#archives

The Humanities and the Challenges of the New Europe: Culture, Language, Identitiess: SELICUP 8
Alcudia, Majorca, Spain, 24-26 October 2018
Deadline for proposals: 31 January 2018
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1810/

Contemporary African and Black Diasporic Spaces in Europe
A special issue of Open Cultural Studies, De Gruyter Open
Deadline for proposals: 28 February 2018
http://essenglish.org/cfp/books-journals-2018-01-03/#diaspora

Women’s Spring: Feminism, Nationalism and Civil Disobedience
University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK, 21-23 June 2018
Deadlne for proposals: 1 April 2018
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1806/#womens-spring

Call for Papers: ELOPE 15 (1), 2018

ELOPE: English Language Overseas Perspectives and Enquiries (http://revije.ff.uni-lj.si/elope) is a double-blind, peer-reviewed academic journal that publishes original research of English language, literature, teaching and translation.

The spring 2018 issue of ELOPE is dedicated to the position and role of speculative fiction and especially science fiction in a world that is increasingly becoming speculative and science fictional. The globalized, digitally mediated nature of contemporary realities and, indeed, individuals, increasingly corresponds to those imagined by the literary cyberpunk of the 1980s – by the movement which with its formal and thematic properties arguably blurred the dividing line between the “mainstream” literary fiction and the science fiction genre. In the first decade of the third millennium, the extrapolations of current technologies and science typically associated with the genre seem to be moving from the temporal to the spatial axis, that is, from the futures far far away to the multiplicity of presents and realities that are parallel to ours. Jaak Tomberg attributes this collapse of futurity to the “cognitively dissonant pace of change in contemporary technocultural society” which renders imagining of ontologically different futures impossible. Approaching the issue from the perspective of postmodern theory, we can similarly ascertain that in a world in which the digital code precedes reality, the present is a priory infused with futurity, and any (literary) speculation cannot NOT be realistic. On the other hand, recent developments in the field increasingly reveal an alternative, radically different approach to futurity. In the 2014 collection of essays on contemporary science fiction SF Now, for instance, contributors acknowledge the prevalence of texts in which the future is a furtherance of the technocultural, late capitalist present; however, with regard to the social, cultural and historical relevance of the genre in the coming years, their focus is directed at the narratives in which the future transcends imaginable possibilities and inspects the potentialities of a different ontological order.

What, then, is science fiction today? What is its role? Has the collapse of futurity onto the present caused an irretrievable convergence of the speculative and the mimetic? How does that reflect on the language used? The stylistic properties? On the ways such fiction is translated? How much sense does it make to treat science fiction – or anything else for that matter – as a genre significantly different from other instances of writing in the context of the postmodern paradigm which fundamentally revels in hybridity? To what an extent do traditional definitions of the genre still apply? What can be considered cognitively dissonant and what can be considered a novum in a world that seems to have no outside? Can there be an outside, and if so what is it (would it be) like? What role can science fiction play in our imaginings of the future? And of our present? What does it have to offer? What can it teach us? These are some of the issues we would like to address in the up-coming issue of ELOPE. The editors warmly invite contributors to submit original research on these and related topics, and to provide insights from as wide a range of perspectives, approaches and disciplines as possible – not only from the seemingly primary domain  of literary studies, but also from the perspective of language and translation studies, as well as ELT.

The language of contributions is English. Papers should be between 5,000 and 8,000 words in length, with an abstract of 150–180 words. They should be submitted electronically, and should conform to the author guidelines (http://revije.ff.uni-lj.si/elope/about/submissions). Any inquiries can be sent to Andrej Stopar (andrej.stopar@ff.uni-lj.si). Submission deadline: April 1st, 2018.

Call for Topics for EJES

Call for Topics for Three Special Issues of European Journal of English Studies

(Volume 24, to be published in 2020)

EJES presents work of the highest quality in English literature, linguistics and cultural studies from the multidisciplinary and multicultural perspectives that characterise the study of English in Europe. The journal’s acronym ‘EJES’ reflects our aspiration to publish cutting-edge research within an outlook that questions boundaries between disciplines and cultural contexts. For us, ‘European’ does not describe a geography, but a situation in which ‘English’ is studied and taught in both Anglophone and non-Anglophone contexts and across a range of disciplines. The general editors are currently seeking proposals for topics for three special issues for Volume 24, to be published in 2020.

EJES is published by Taylor & Francis, a division of Routledge. The journal is peer reviewed and has an emphasis on interdisciplinary projects. The general editors encourage proposals for special issues that span divides between cultural theory, literary analysis and linguistics. Guest editing teams should ideally be comprised of individuals working in different localities within Europe. They should also have significant editing experience.

Recent special issues have included the following:

Volume 21 (2017)

  • 21.2 Debating the Afropolitan, eds Emilia María Durán-Almarza, Carla Rodríguez González, Ananya J. Kabir
  • 21.1 Getting and Spending, eds Silvana Colella, Brecht de Groote, Frederik Van Dam

Volume 20 (2016)

  • 20.1 Formulaicity in Language and Literature, eds Ian MacKenzie and Martin A. Kayman
  • 20.2 J.M. Coetzee and the non-English Literary Traditions, eds María J. López, & Kai Wiegandt
  • 20.3 The Politics of Form, eds Sarah Copland & Greta Olson

For more information, please consult our website at:
http://essenglish.org/ejes/

or contact the general editors for details or with 200-300 word proposals for special topics:

Book Announcement: Joseph Conrad and the Voicing of Textuality

Claude Maisonnat, Joseph Conrad and the Voicing of Textuality

Published by Maria Curie-Sklodowska University Press, Lublin

Distributed by Columbia University Press, New York
June 2017
ISBN: 9788377849309
416 Pages
Format: Hardcover

Joseph Conrad and the Voicing of Textuality offers an original approach to Conrad’s work rooted in linguistics and psychoanalytic theory. Claude Maisonnat provides fresh insight into the poetics of textuality by introducing the concept of textual voice, as opposed to the traditional conceptions of authorial voice and narrative voice. Understood as the main vector of poeticity in a text, textual voice is an offshoot of the Lacanian object-voice trimmed to fit a literary context. It enables the reader to uncover deeply concealed motivations and perceive unsuspected connections to the biographical background of the texts. At the same time, it offers new ways of structuring close reading and opens vistas into the mysteries of creation. Maisonnat gives insightful readings of Conrad’s best-known and less widely read works while developing a theoretically rich framework to tackle the notions of style and voice in literature.

This book is volume 26 of the series Conrad: Eastern and Western Perspectives, edited by Wieslaw Krajka.

Claude Maisonnat is professor emeritus at the Université Lumière Lyon 2. He has published widely on Conrad’s works, including a book on Lord Jim.

 

Book Announcement: Women in International and Universal Exhibitions, 1876–1937

Rebecca Rogers and Myriam Boussahba-Bravard (eds.), Women in International and Universal Exhibitions, 1876–1937

© 2018 – Routledge

286 pages | 17 B/W Illus.
ISBN: 1138636053

This book argues for the importance of bringing women and gender more directly into the dynamic field of exposition studies. Reclaiming women for the history of world fairs (1876-1937), it also seeks to introduce new voices into these studies, dialoguing across disciplinary and national historiographies.

From the outset, women participated not only as spectators, but also as artists, writers, educators, artisans and workers, without figuring among the organizers of international exhibitions until the 20th century. Their presence became more pointedly acknowledged as feminist movements developed within the Western World and specific spaces dedicated to women’s achievements emerged.

International exhibitions emerged as showcases of “modernity” and “progress,” but also as windows onto the foreign, the different, the unexpected and the spectacular. As public rituals of celebration, they transposed national ceremonies and protests onto an international stage. For spectators, exhibitions brought the world home; for organizers, the entire world was a fair.

Women were actors and writers of the fair narrative, although acknowledgment of their contribution was uneven and often ephemeral. Uncovering such silence highlights how gendered the triumphant history of modernity was, and reveals the ways women as a category engaged with modern life within that quintessential modern space—the world fair.

Rebecca Rogers is Professor in the History of Education at the Université Paris Descartes, France.

Myriam Boussahba-Bravard is Professor in British Civilization at the Université Paris Diderot, France.

Gender Studies Network: News

An augmented version of the Directory of GSN Members has been posted. For downloading and searching it, please click:

http://essenglish.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Directory.pdf

A survey of the activities of GSN members at ESSE-Brno has been posted as well: There will be a meeting of the Gender Studies Network, which is open to all conference participants. In addition, we are pleased to highlight that members are variously involved as lecturers and convenors. This is now available on the GSN Members page: http://essenglish.org/gsn-members/#Brno

Book announcement:

Jean-Michel Ganteau, Christine Reynier and Isabelle Brasme (eds.), The Humble in 19th- to 21st-Century British Literature and Arts

 

Description: Through its take on ‘the humble’, this volume attempts to reveal the depth and philosophical relevance of literature, its ethical and political dimension as well as its connection to life. Because it can be associated with social class, religion, psychology or ethics, the notion of ‘the humble’ lends itself to diverse types of studies. The papers collected in this volume argue that in the course of the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, artists and writers have revisited the term ‘humble’ and, far from treating it as a simple motif, have raised it to the status of an aesthetic category. This category can first foster a better understanding of fiction, poetry, painting, and their representation of precarious lives through various genres and modes. It may also draw attention to neglected or depreciated humble novels or art forms that developed from the Victorian to the contemporary period, through the Edwardian and the modernist eras. Finally, it helps revise assumptions about the literature and art of the period and signals to a poetics of the humble. The works of art examined here explore the humble as a possible capacity and ethical force, a way of being and acting.

Contents:

Introduction: Isabelle Brasme, Jean-Michel Ganteau, Christine Reynier

Humble Art Forms

  • Laurence Roussillon-Constant: Artful Humility: A Pre-Raphaelite Ideal?
  • Sophie Aymes: Autographic Wood Engraving: Modernist D. I. Y.
  • Claudia Tobin: ‘The Humbleness of all his Objects’: Cézanne, Still Life, and Modern Writers

Aestheticizing Religious Humility

  • Stéphane Sitayeb: From Humbleness to Humiliation: Physical Losses and Spiritual Gains in The Hill of Dreams, by Arthur Machen
  • Shirley Bricout: The Humble Touch of the Good Samaritan in D.H. Lawrence’s Aaron’s Rod
  • José Mari Yebra: The Humble Side of Motherhood in Colm Tóibín’s The Testament of Mary

Gendering the Humble

  • Barbara Puschmann-Nalenz: The Humble, Gender and the Local in Recent British and Irish Narratives
  • Susana Onega: Lesbian Invisibility and the Politics of Representation of the Lady and the Humble Servant in Sarah Waters’ Affinity

Precariousness

  • Angela Locatelli: ‘The Humble/d’ in Literature and Philosophy: Precariousness, Vulnerability, and the Pragmatics of Social Visibility
  • Corina Stan: A Ship of Fools: Precarious Lives in 1660s / 1980s England
  • Silvia Pellicer-Orti : Writing and Loving: Strategies to Overcome Humbleness in Lynne Reid Banks’ Children at the Gate

Self-effacement

  • Pascale Tollance:  From Humiliation to Humility: Swift’s Aesth/et(h)ics of Self-Effacement in The Light of Day
  • Xavier LeBrun: Leaving Jacob Room: Narratorial Humility in Jacob’s Room
  • Aude Haffen: “In a tactful, impersonal way, we have become quite intimate”: Christopher Isherwood’s Humble Persona and Inoperative Narratives in Goodbye to Berlin (1939)
  • Adeline Arniac: ‘We can’t start again. We can end again.’ Humble Inchoation in a Selection from Harold Pinter’s Memory Plays

The British Humble Abroad 

  • Leila Haghshenas: The Aesthetics of Humility in Leonard Woolf’s The Village in the Jungle
  • Laurent Mellet: The British Humble Abroad: Humanism in Practice in E. M. Forster’s First Novel (Where Angels Fear to Tread) and Jonathan Coe’s Latest (Expo 58)

Further details: https://www.pulm.fr/index.php/9782367812489.html

Gender Studies Network: CFPs of particular relevance

LondonIsOpen: London as a Cosmopolitan City in Contemporary Culture
Nr 20 of Other Modernities, November 2018
Deadline for proposals: 15 October 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/books-journals-2017-10-12/#LondonIsOpen

Contemporary Victoriana: Victorian literature and Popular and Material cultures
Centre universitaire de Troyes, University of Reims, France, 16 March 2018
New extended deadline for proposals: 20 October 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1803/#victoriana

Museums in literature – Literature in museums
A forthcoming issue of Journal MuseumEdu
Deadline for proposals: 31 October 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/books-journals-2017-10-12/#museum

(Im)possible Worlds
Journal of Philology and Intercultural Communication
Deadline for proposals: 1 November 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/books-journals-2017-10-12/

Modernist Objects
Paris Sorbonne University (VALE EA 4085), France, 13-16 June 2018
Deadline for proposals: 15 November 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1806/

Female suffrage in British art, literature and history
University of Toulouse, France, 24-25 May 2018
Deadline for proposals: 20 December 2017
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1805/#female_suffrage

Transfigured Voices: Vocal disorders, disruptions and impersonations
University of Caen Normandie, France, 17-18 May 2018
Deadline for proposals: 15 January 2018
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1805/#voices

Katherine Mansfield: New Directions
Birkbeck, University of London, UK, 28-29 June 2018
Deadline for proposals: 1 February 2018
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1806/#KM

Crime Fiction: Insiders and Outsiders. Captivating Criminality 5
Corsham Court, Bath Spa University, UK, 28-30 June 2018
Deadline for proposals: 3 February 2018
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1806/

Romantic E-Scapes: Popular Romance in the Digital Age
University of the Balearic Islands, Spain, 9-11 July 2018
Deadline for proposal: 28 February 2018
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1807/

War and Peace: Victorian Popular Fiction Association’s 10th Annual Conference
Institute of English Studies, Senate House, London, UK, 3-7 July 2018
Deadline for proposls: 2 March 2018
http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1807/#war_and_peace