Books and special issues of journals – Permanently valid

“Ecocritical Theory and Practice” book series

“Ecocritical Theory and Practice” (Lexington Books, imprint of Rowman & Littlefield) highlights innovative scholarship at the interface of literary/cultural studies and the environment, seeking to foster an ongoing dialogue between academics and environmental activists. Works that explore environmental issues through literatures, oral traditions, and cultural/media practices around the world are welcome. The series features books by established ecocritics that examine the intersection of theory and practice, including both monographs and edited volumes. Proposals are invited in the range of topics covered by ecocriticism, including but not limited to works informed by cross-cultural and transnational approaches; postcolonial studies; ecofeminism; ecospirituality, ecotheology, and religious studies; film/media and visual cultural studies; environmental aesthetics and arts; ecopoetics; and animal studies.

http://rowman.com/Action/SERIES/LEX/ETAP#

Contact person: Julia Tofantšuk, Tallinn University, Estonia jul@tlu.ee

(posted 23 December 2016)


The Journal of Cultural Mediation

The Journal of Cultural Mediation of the SSML Fondazione Villaggio dei Ragazzi “don Salvatore d’Angelo” focuses on the role of culture in perceiving and translating reality. The aim of this Journal is to promote research in communication, especially by investigating language, languages, cultural models, mediation and interculturality, welcoming contributions focussing on cultural mediation in modern society.
In particular manuscripts should concern:
– The role of the cultural mediator
– Linguistic/cultural mediation teaching methodologies
– Cultural mediation and identity
– Linguistic mediation in specialized discourse
– Analysis of text translations
– Quality interpreting – Interpreting as cultural mediation
– Professionalization and professional issues of interpreters
– Interdisciplinarity within Interpreting Studies
– Teaching methodologies in interpreter training
– Research on any aspect of interpreting in any research paradigm (including cognitive science, psycholinguistics, neurolinguistics, sociolinguistics, applied linguistics, discourse analysis, pragmatics, anthropology, semiotics, comparative cultural studies, cross-cultural communication, etc.)

All papers submitted to The Journal of Cultural Mediation should be original, neither having been previously published nor being considered elsewhere at the time of submission.
Papers can be written in Italian, English, French, Spanish or German, they should not exceed 6000 words and should be preceded by an abstract of 200-250 words. If the language of the paper is not English, please include a translation of the abstract in English as well. At the head of your abstract please indicate the title of the proposal, the name of the author/s, affiliation and email address. Please include five to six keywords.
The editor will select contributions for each issue and notify authors of acceptance or otherwise according to the dates below.
Authors wishing to contribute to the Journal of Cultural Mediation are welcome to submit their abstracts as email attachments to:
jcm.ssmlmaddaloni@yahoo.it

For further information, contributors are encouraged to read the guidelines of the journal, given on our website: http://www.ssmlmaddaloni.it/rivista.asp

(posted 16 February 2012)


The Brontës and the Idea of Influence
A thematic dossier in the “Writers, writings” section of LISA e-journal

In March 2007, Stevie Davies, Patricia Duncker and Michele Roberts gathered around Patsy Stoneman at Haworth in Yorkshire to talk about the influence that the Brontës had had on their evolutions as authors, and more generally, about the source of inspiration that the most famous family of writers in England could represent. Patsy Stoneman had already tackled the topic by publishing a book entitled The Brontë Influence in 2004 with the help of Charmian Knight. The issue of LISA e-journal “Re-Writing Jane Eyre: Jane Eyre, Past and Present” is further evidence of Charlotte Brontë’s influence on the writers of the following decades or centuries. So far, these studies have been quite limited and this field of research, “the Brontë influence”, offers a wide range of possible developments.
Moreover, if the four authors’ poetry and novels have already been the object of numerous studies, there is much left to write about the influences which were exerted on the Brontës, whether religious, literary, philosophical or cultural. Taking account of the context of  a work is often a good way of understanding the issues underlying a text: the path taken by the Brontës, their journeys, their stays abroad, the books they read, etc. could prove to be very enlightening. Besides these external factors, one could also consider the interactions between the three sisters, who wrote in the same room and who read passages from their works aloud.
A final aspect to identify and study could be the influences which are exerted within the Brontës’ works themselves. How can one account for the progress of the heroes and heroines? How is the influence that characters have on one another expressed? What role does nature play in the destiny of characters? Which other elements intervene in the novels?

This dossier devoted to the Brontës intends to analyse the works through the perspective of influence and three different fields of research can thus be considered:
–    influences on the Brontës
–    the idea of influence in the Brontës’ works
–    the Brontë influence on the writers of the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries.
Please send your proposals (one A4 page maximum) to Dr. Élise Ouvrard ouvrard_elise@hotmail.com.
Accepted articles will be published in the thematic dossier “The Brontës and the Idea of Influence” on the website of LISA e-journal:
http://lisa.revues.org/index424.html

(posted 10 January 2008, updated 3 November 2010)


Controversy: Literary Studies and Ethics
JLT-Journal of Literary Theory online

Submissions are continuously accepted.
Are literary scholars and critics supposed to voice their view on normative questions within their academic writings? How far should world views, political opinions and evaluations enter into the scholarly and critical work with literary texts? Is it even possible to exclude such judgements from literary studies? How and why do different traditions of literary studies treat these problems divergently?
Submissions are expected to refer to previous contributions to this controversy by Peter J. Rabinowitz and Marshall W. Gregory, which can be found at http://www.jltonline.de/index.php/articles/article/view/254/775 and at http://www.jltonline.de/index.php/articles/article/view/287/879
Please contact the editorial office for further details at jlt@phil.uni-goettingen.de.

(posted 10 February 2011)