Books and special issues of journals – Deadlines January-March 2019

Epistemocriticism of Victorian and Edwardian Literature
Cahiers victoriens et édouardiens 90 (Autumn 2019)
Deadline for proposals: 15 January 2019

Issue number 90 of Cahiers victoriens et édouardiens (http://journals.openedition.org/cve) will be entitled “Epistemocriticism of Victorian and Edwardian Literature” and will be published in the autumn of 2019. It is meant as a tribute to Annie Escuret who was professor at Université Paul Valéry–Montpellier 3 for many years and the director of this journal from 1997 to 2013, and it will also stand as a continuation of issue 46, “H. G. Wells : Science & Fiction in the 19th century”, which was edited by Annie Escuret in October 1997, when she took up the direction of the journal and brought it to its renowned standard.

That issue proposed the then innovative approach of epistemocriticism: Eliot, Dickens, Meredith, Hardy and Wells were studied in the light of her favourite contemporary French theorists—Michel Serres, Henri Atlan, Michel Foucault, Michel Pierssens, Ilya Prigogine and Isabelle Stengers—as well as that of Anglophone scholars, such as Gillian Beer (Darwin’s Plots), Sally Shuttleworth (George Eliot and Nineteenth-Century Science), George Levine (Darwin and the Novelists), Gerard Holston (Thematic Origin of Scientific Thought : Kepler to Einstein), or Peter Morton (The Vital Science : Biology and the Literary Imagination). It was thus that issue 46 meant to capture the relationships between science and fiction and more generally the encounters between oeuvres and knowledge. Such encounters are at the core of the epistemocritic perspective which consists in analyzing the uses a text makes of scientific knowledge and how it in turn produces knowledge itself. Indeed, more than any other period in human history, the 19th century witnessed the extensive development of science and literature, with the growth of the realist / naturalist novel, but also the advent and rapidly growing hegemony of a vast number of sciences and a new episteme.

Sciences are certainly many and varied, and to the well-known and established sciences, the 19th century added some of the most illustrious – or notorious – pseudo-sciences, namely J. K. Lavater’s physiognomony, Franz Josef Gall’s phrenology, Cesare Lombroso’s criminal anthropology, as well as graphology, pathognomy, craniology, which were often used to dubious ends. However, this was also a century which most particularly witnessed much more seriously-oriented scientific developments, such as those of economics, thermology, thermodynamics, cosmology, physics, chemistry, electricity, magnetism, geology, biology, psychology, sociology, medicine, heredity, evolutionism, determinism, eugenics, physiology. The 19th century can boast the advent of sciences concerned with the living world, a potentially fertile connecting ground between sciences and literature. Thanks to widespread theories of the living world, cultural representations of living organisms diffused widely and influenced historical, political and social thinkers; simple analogies, such as grafting, invention, cross-breeding are just as many scientific concepts that found their way into the literary works of Victorian and Edwardian authors, who were both witnesses and actors in this most fertile period.

Please send your proposals to Luc Bouvard by January 15th, 2019 at the latest.

luc.bouvard@univ-montp3.fr

Your article may be in French or in English. Please abide by the « instructions to authors » posted on the CVE website at the following address.

https://journals.openedition.org/cve/157 for articles written in French.

https://journals.openedition.org/cve/158 for articles written in English.

(posted 29 June 2018)


Our City or An Attempt at Exhausting a Place in Leicestershire
Submissions in a book about Leicestershire edited by Jon Wilkins, published by Dahlia Publishing
Deadline for Submissions: 31 January 2019

I was reading my favourite Francophile crime writer, Cara Blacks “Murder in Saint Germain”. Her hero, Aimee Leduc scoots around Paris solving crimes. Paris is the key, the second most important character in her books. Aimee’s partner Rene, mentions Georges Perec and his writing in the story. Perec spent three days in St Sulphice, Paris, watching Paris and its people which resulted in a creative wonder that is “An Attempt at Exhausting a Place in Paris”.
Inspired by Perec’s work, I would like to invite writers and non-writers to help craft Leicester’s own version of “An Attempt at Exhausting a Place in Paris.”
In particular, I would like to read pieces on the following topics: the city, the county, its people, places of interest, social history, sport or food.
You can use the city as a backdrop for your story, or turn it into the main character. It could be set in the past, present or future. It can be a ghost story set in the city, a short story about your love of Leicester City FC, a poem about one of the green spaces, there are no hard and fast rules, but it must capture the spirit of Leicester or Leicestershire. It should show your LOVE of the city.
Submissions invited include: • Fiction 2,000-4,000 words • Poetry 50 lines maximum • Short Story 2,000-4,000 words • Flash fiction 100-500 words • Creative non-fiction 2,000-4,000 words • Essay 2,000-4,000 words We welcome contributions in your mother tongue, accompanied by an English translation. • Each contributor will receive two complimentary copies of the anthology, scheduled to be published by Dahlia Publishing in October 2019. • You retain individual copyright of your contribution. Please send completed submissions, along with a short bio to leicesterstories@btinternet.com You will be given the opportunity to read your work at the launch event. Deadline for Submissions: 31 January, 2019.
Jon Wilkins

(posted 11 September 2018)


 ‘My Soul is a Witness”: Reimagining African American Women’s Spirituality and the Black Female Body in African American Literature
A special issue of Religions
Deadline: 15 February 15 2019
Edited by: Carol E. Henderson, Vice Provost for Diversity, Professor of English and Africana Studies, University of Delaware
Katherine Clay Bassard declares nearly twenty years ago in her formative text Spiritual Interrogations, that in order to more fully consider the multiple ways Black women have spiritually represented themselves as sacred subjects in African American literature, one must consider a variety of religious traditions that help to shape these religious experiences, including but not limited to Christianity, Islamic, African and neo-African traditional religions, among others. More importantly, the practice of examining black women’s intertextuality (what Bassard terms spiritual interrogation) supports ways of reading that provide a richer understanding of the ways in which the sacred and secular, the spiritual and political serve as lens through which to consider African American female subjectivity in all of its nuanced complexity.
This special issue seeks creative and thoughtful essays that explore the ways in which writers reclaim, reimagine, and in some ways create the black female body in African American literature using the theoretical, social, cultural, and religious frameworks of spirituality and religion. Of key importance to this collection is black women’s agency and self-advocacy—acknowledged and affirmed in prose, poetry, essays, speeches, written plays, or short stories. Whether it is Indigo (Sassafrass, Cypress & Indigo) conceiving a world with her dolls that shepherds her through her rite of passage to womanhood, Baby Suggs declaring in her “fixing ceremonies” in the Clearing that “in this here place, we flesh,” (Beloved),  Mattie Michael healing herself and other Black women and their communal trauma in her bathing rituals (Women of Brewster Place), or Florence at the altar (Go Tell It On the Mountain), authors have sought to discuss the tensions of a lived and imagined existence pivoting the sacred and secular through concepts such as forgiveness, redemption, political freedom and social liberation, passion, alienation, motherhood, sex, marriage, among others.
If you would like to submit an essay for consideration in this special e-book collection, please follow the special link at the head of this CFP for more information.
Religions is an international, open-access scholarly journal, publishing peer reviewed studies of religious thought and practice. It is indexed in A&HCI (Web of Science), ATLA Religion Database and in SCOPUS, which gave it a Citescore of 0.51 and listed it among the top 6% of the 371 religious studies journals SCOPUS surveyed in 2016. PDF downloads per month = 59,700+/-.
(posted 21 August 2018)