Books and special issues of journals – Deadlines January-March 2018

Industrial Heritage in the UK : Mutations, Conversions and Representations
Contributions are invited to an issue of LISA e-journal
Deadline for proposals: 1 March 2018

https://lisa.revues.org/9025

Since the mid-1950s, the UK has witnessed a growing interest in the study, protection and conservation of industrial heritage, and is often considered as a leader in the exploration of the significance and potentialities of such historical remains. This rise in public awareness was accompanied by the development of industrial archaeology as a discipline in its own right, which later led to industrial heritage being seen as a resource for regeneration and for a global reflexion on the protection of memories of the collective past. The discovery of the economic and social potential of derelict buildings has gone hand in hand with the development of (living) museums, with a surge in urban renewal policies in the context of deindustrialization and with preoccupations with sustainable development or green tourism.

This LISA e-journal issue will thus focus on industrial infrastructures such as former textile mills, factories or warehouses – whether listed or not – along with their surroundings when they constitute a landscape and/or are integrated into a conservation area. The palimpsestic quality of this industrial past is integral to popular and collective memories that are kept alive through museum initiatives whether in the private, public or charitable sectors but also through fictional or documentary films, web sites or the social media. Nostalgia for a glorious past era of British history contributes to the desire to preserve and celebrate the unique skills, the impressive know-how and more generally the salient traits of a bygone civilization.

We welcome contributions aiming to explore changes in the field of industrial heritage and industrial conservation and their instrumental role in the provision of spaces for tourism, culture, and urban regeneration, while bearing in mind the potential conflicts arising from the relationship between these various processes. Examining representations of industrial society and the tangible traces of industry in order to foreground mutations in how industrial heritage has been depicted and perceived since the beginning of the industrial revolution thus offers a more comprehensive picture of the contrasting visions of a once neglected heritage.

The perspective chosen for this Revue LISA / LISA e-journal issue is inter- and pluri-disciplinary, articulated around a variety of approaches including cultural geography, cultural history, art history, media studies, urban studies, heritage studies, architecture, etc.. Studies offering comparisons between the UK and other geographical area(s) or country/ies, are also welcome.

Possible themes thus include (but are not limited to):

  • Care of industrial and technical collections, the conservation of industrial artefacts.
  • Representations of a vanishing industrial society and its heritage: depicting the industrial past, its people and its physical reminders in urban and rural landscapes.
  • Memorizing the industrial past: educational projects, social media, TV or cinematic fictions or documentaries, festivals, attractions, museum developments, memorabilia…
  • Industrial ruins and post-industrial landscapes: creative acts inspired by engagements with physical testimonies to the past, their otherness and unstable state.
  • Recycling industrial buildings and their immediate environment through culture and heritage.
  • New functions for vacant industrial buildings: the discourse of sustainable urban development or of imaginative regeneration of derelict or unused sites.
  • Reinterpreting industrial sites for creative uses: questioning the inventiveness, viability and durability of adaptive re-use by such projects.
  • Conservation and conversions: conflicts arising between architectural, cultural, historical, economic and promotional priorities.
  • The contribution of industrial heritage to tourism and employment in post-industrial areas.
  • Industrial heritage/past as an inspiration for fashion, design, decoration or life style …

Proposals (abstract and bio, not exceeding 500 words) should be sent to Aurore Caignet, Renée Dickason and Tim Edensor by 1st March 2018. The deadline for completed articles is 1st October 2018.
Contributions should not exceed 6,000 words in length and should be sent together with a short biography of the author (max. 200 words) and an abstract (max. 300 words). For submissions, you are invited to read and follow the norms for presentation indicated on the peer-reviewed Revue LISA / LISA e-journal website https://lisa.revues.org/159
ISSN: 1762-6153, Presses Universitaires de Rennes, Revues.org.

(posted 8 July 2017)

Calls for papers – Conferences taking place in September 2018

Vladimir Nabokov and Translation: Transatlantic Symposium
Lille, France, Spring 2018, and Chapel Hill, USA, Fall 2018 (the precise dates will be announced later)
Deadlines for proposals: 1 September 2017 (Lille), 1 May 2018 (Chapel Hill)

The precise date of this conference will be announced later.

Please send your abstracts (maximum 500 words, in English or French) to the following email addresses: julie.loison-charles@vladimir-nabokov.org and shvabrin@email.unc.edu
If you wish your abstract to be considered for the first installment of the Symposium in Lille, France, please send your abstract by September 1, 2017, and by May 1, 2018, for Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

This project is organized with the French Society Vladimir Nabokov – Les Chercheurs Enchantés, The Université of Lille, SHS (France) (Unit Research CECILLE) and the Center for Slavic Eurasian and East European Studies at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (USA).

See the full call for papers at http://essenglish.org/cfp/conf1805/#Nabokov

(posted 16 May 2017)


Calls for papers – Conferences taking place in July 2018

British Women and Parody
Amiens, France, 6 July 2018
Deadline for proposals: 17 December 2017

Keynote speaker: Professor Margaret Stetz

(University of Delaware)

This one-day conference will investigate the relationships between women and parody in the British Isles. It is organized by the research team CORPUS (EA 4295) at the University of Picardy and will be held at the Logis du Roy (Amiens, France) on Friday 6th July 2018.

Parody, a simultaneous act of revival and revision, is double-coded. Imitating the original work implies familiarity with the original work and includes reactivation and renewal. The parodic ethos is partly “respectful or deferential” (Linda Hutcheon) and imitation has a large part to play in literary apprenticeship, yet repetition with an element of transformation can also have comical, satirical and distancing effects. The historical distance between the parodist and the imitated text takes on a reflexive and critical form when the work is revisited with a view to question or comment. In “claiming and appropriating” other texts (Julia Kristeva), the parodist situates himself or herself in relation to the original author. The purpose of this conference is to investigate the part played by gender in this positioning.

Women scholars are well-represented among theorists and analysts of parody, but the engagement of women authors with parody has been neglected. However, the British literary tradition includes many highly respected – and parodiable – female authors while, for many women, writing has meant “revision (…) an act of survival” (Adrienne Rich). Women’s writing has indeed often been judged secondary in intention, scope and even literary value. So, how can women’s engagement with parody be read? Does the under-representation of women writers in anthologies of parody, both as parodied authors and as parodists, reflect the masculine domination and appreciation of the Western literary canon? Do cases of conscious cross-gender parody work to denounce clichés of femininity and masculinity, thus destabilizing gender (Judith Butler)? What is at stake in women’s parodies of each other? An anxiety of influence? Rivalry? Differing perceptions of what femininity is? Can the question of female parodies be historicized?

Please send proposals (300 words) for 20-minute papers with a title and a short bio-bibliographic note to nathalie.saudo@u-picardie.fr by December 17th.

We will consider papers on parodies that are both literary and visual: fiction, poetry, drama, graphic novels as well as other media and the history of publishing.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Women parodying men
  • Women parodying women
  • Parodies of femininity and écriture féminine
  • Female literary models and their imitators
  • Gendered revisions of canonical texts
  • Women in anthologies of parody
  • Women during the Victorian “golden age of parody”
  • The politics of parodic humour
  • Self-parody
  • Uncertain authorship and literary hoaxes

(posted 19 July 2017)


Alliance, Antagonism, Authorship: Eleventh International Scott Conference
Université Paris-Sorbonne, France, 10-13 July 2018
Deadline for proposals: 30 September 2017

“Children know, / Instictive taught, the friend and foe” (The Lady of the Lake)

Walter Scott’s ties with France were personal as well as intellectual and artistic. His wife was of French birth and his interest in France was manifested both in his non-fiction (with his Life of Napoleon and the final Series of Tales of a Grand-father) and in his novels, since he chose 15th-century France as the location of his first novel set on the European continent. While Quentin Durward took some time in achieving success in Britain, its French translation, Quentin Durward, ou l’Écossais à la cour de Louis XI was immediately popular and inspired French writers and artists. Victor Hugo, for instance, wrote a laudatory review of the novel in La Muse française, the chief organ of the French Romantic movement, and partly conceived his own Notre-Dame de Paris as a response to it. Eugène Delacroix, one of the foremost French Romantic artists, drew several sketches based on scenes from Scott’s novel and painted L’Assassinat de l’évêque de Liège (The Murder of the Bishop of Liège, 1829, musée du Louvre).

Given that the eleventh international Scott conference will take place in Paris, the Auld Alliance seemed an obvious choice for the general theme of the conference. As the French poet and political writer Alain Chartier declared in 1428, sixty years before the events described in Quentin Durward, ‘this alliance was not written on a sheepskin parchment but engraved in man’s live flesh, written not with ink but with blood’. While these words underline the depth of the relation uniting France and Scotland they also ominously hint at the violent wartime context in which the treaty was concluded for the first time.

The typical pattern of Scott’s plots is one in which the main protagonist is caught in a conflict between two opposite forces embodying different stages in the evolution of society. As a result, antagonism is one aspect of his work that has been the focus of much critical study, especially from a Marxist angle, following Georg Luckács’s seminal work on the historical novel. It might however still be possible to engage in this field by resorting, for instance, to contemporary debates on the values of agonistic rhetorics – which some critics see as a means to justify domination while others, on the contrary, stress “the affirmative dimension of contestation” (Bonnie Honig, Political Theory and the Displacements of Politics, 1993: 15). The polyphonic – sometimes even verging on the carnivalesque – quality of Scott’s works has, in the past few decades, been emphasized to qualify earlier critical suggestions that the Waverley Novels were a teleological tale of Union.

Acknowledging the agonistic structure of Scott’s texts and being aware that early analyses of Scott’s works as straightforward, unequivocal unionist propaganda are now perceived as an over-simplification, should not, however, lead us to reject the notion of alliance as a potentially meaningful trope to analyse his texts, especially if we choose to define this notion of alliance not simply in terms of its political dimension, but, more broadly, as a bond or connection, an affinity. Speakers are therefore invited to consider such issues as national or international cultural dialogue, within Scott’s own body of works as well as between his work and that of other artists. Indeed, on the back of A.-J.-B. Defauconpret’s immensely influential French translations, the international success of the Waverley novels was such that they influenced many of his contemporaries – as well as subsequent generations of authors – at home and abroad. Works such as Louis Maigron’s Le Roman historique à l’époque romantique : Essai sur l’influence de Walter Scott (1898) or, more recently, Ian Duncan’s Scott’s Shadow : The Novel in Romantic Edinburgh (2007), The Reception of Sir Walter Scott in Europe, ed. Murray Pittock (2007), Richard Maxwell’s The Historical Novel in Europe 1650-1950 (2009) or Ann Rigney’s The Afterlives of Walter Scott: Memory on the Move (2012) have demonstrated that studying Scott’s works from a comparative literature or inter-textual perspective – or even within a broader cultural and social framework – can be most illuminating. In the wake of the ‘Reworking Walter Scott’ Conference (Dundee, April 2017), we will not only welcome papers analysing the influence of Scott on other writers – or the latters’ resistance to his ascendancy – but also papers that study the dialogue between Scott’s works and all forms of adaptation or secondary authorship.

Scott’s historical works and his involvement in contemporary politics will clearly offer opportunities to discuss his conception of the importance and value of alliances between countries – including Scotland’s complex position, torn between Anglophile and Francophile parties. It might also be interesting to compare the views he expresses in his fiction with the ones he expresses in his non-fictional works to determine whether they coincide or follow different logics. Finally, studying his work as a ballad collector and his social or epistolary connexions with most of the other great writers and the great publishing houses of the period will make it possible to see whether he saw writing as a collaborative or competitive activity.

These are of course only a few lines along which the theme of alliance can be interpreted and potential speakers should feel free to offer other interpretations of or variations on this theme.

Please note that the deadline for this conference is unusually early. Unfortunately, the French academic calendar implies that we should be able to finalise the programme by mid-October 2017 in order to book rooms for the conference and apply for funding.

Speakers are therefore invited to send a 300 word proposal to the following address by September 30th 2017: scottconference2018paris@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/eleventhinternationalscottconference

(posted 1 June 2017)

 

 

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Books and special issues of journals – Deadlines October-December 2017

Body, Voice and Language Learning in Higher Education
Volume 37 No 2 (June 2018) of The journal Researching and Teaching Languages for Specific Purposes
Deadline for proposals: 30 October 2017

http://apliut.revues.org/5688

The journal Researching and Teaching Languages for Specific Purposes publishes the results of research carried out in the domain of language teaching and learning in Higher Education, for all languages and cultures. Since its beginnings it has been oriented towards both theoretical and applied research while maintaining a pedagogical dimension through the publication of notes on teaching experiences in each issue.

The journal has four main objectives. The first is to encourage the publication of research carried out in the field of teaching and learning languages in Higher Education. The second objective is to contribute to the training of teachers of languages for special purposes by publishing research results and notes on teaching experiences. From the beginning, the third objective has been to encourage the teaching and learning of all foreign languages. Even though most articles are written in French and English, they deal with the teaching and learning of different languages. The fourth objective is to promote young researchers. The journal is recognized for encouraging new authors and, thanks to its wide circulation, allows young researchers to be introduced to the academic community.

Volume 37, number 2, to be published in June 2018, will adress the key question of “Body, Voice and Language Learning in Higher Education”. We welcome all contributions written in either English or French.

Submissions to our journal are peer-reviewed. They must follow fall within one of the four following categories:

  • research articles (25 000 to 40 000 characters altogether, spaces not included);
  • reports (10 000 to 20 000 characters altogether, spaces not included;
  • notes on teaching experiences (8000 to 15 000 characters altogether, spaces not included);
  • book reviews (8000 to 15 000 characters altogether, spaces not included).

Deadline for proposals is October, 30th 2017.

Please send your submission to: apliut@revues.org and linda.terrier@univ-tlse2.fr.

In order to be submitted to the peer-review process, contributions must respect the guidelines for authors as well as the maximum lengths indicated above. See recommendations for authors : http://apliut.revues.org/1965.

(posted 24 June 2017)


Narratives of Religious Conversion from the Enlightenment to the Present
An issue of Vol. 23 of EJES to be published in 2019
Deadline for proposals: 31 October 2017

Guest editors: Ludmilla Kostova (Veliko Turnovo), Efterpi Mitsi (Athens)

Detailed proposals (up to 1,000 words) for essays, as well as all inquiries regarding this issue, should be sent to both editors: Ludmilla Kostova: ludmillak3@gmail.com and Efterpi Mitsi: emitsi@enl.uoa.gr

The deadline for proposals for this volume is 31 October 2017, with delivery of completed essays by 31 March 2018.

The full call for papers is available at http://essenglish.org/ejes/current-cfps/

(posted 24 March 2017)


Fact and Fiction in Contemporary Narratives
An issue of Vol. 23 of EJES to be published in 2019
Deadline for proposals: 31 October 2017

Guest editors: Jan Alber (Aachen) and Alice Bell (Sheffield Hallam University)

Detailed proposals (up to 1,000 words) for essays, as well as all inquiries regarding this issue, should be sent to both editors: Jan Alber: jan.alber@ifaar.rwth-aachen.de and Alice Bell: a.bell@shu.ac.uk

The deadline for proposals for this volume is 31 October 2017, with delivery of completed essays by 31 March 2018.

The full call for papers is available at http://essenglish.org/ejes/current-cfps/

(posted 24 March 2017)


Shame and Shamelessness
An issue of Vol. 23 of EJES to be published in 2019
Deadline for proposals: 31 October 2017

Guest editors: Kaye Mitchell (Manchester), Katrin Röder (Potsdam), Christine Vogt-William (Berlin)

Detailed proposals (up to 1,000 words) for essays, as well as all inquiries regarding this issue, should be sent to all three editors: Katrin Röder: kroeder@uni-potsdam.de, Kaye Mitchell: Kaye.Mitchell@manchester.ac.uk and Christine Vogt-William: cvogtwilliam@yahoo.com

The deadline for proposals for this volume is 31 October 2017, with delivery of completed essays by 31 March 2018.

The full call for papers is available at http://essenglish.org/ejes/current-cfps/

(posted 24 March 2017)


 

Books and special issues of journals – Permanently valid

“Ecocritical Theory and Practice” book series

“Ecocritical Theory and Practice” (Lexington Books, imprint of Rowman & Littlefield) highlights innovative scholarship at the interface of literary/cultural studies and the environment, seeking to foster an ongoing dialogue between academics and environmental activists. Works that explore environmental issues through literatures, oral traditions, and cultural/media practices around the world are welcome. The series features books by established ecocritics that examine the intersection of theory and practice, including both monographs and edited volumes. Proposals are invited in the range of topics covered by ecocriticism, including but not limited to works informed by cross-cultural and transnational approaches; postcolonial studies; ecofeminism; ecospirituality, ecotheology, and religious studies; film/media and visual cultural studies; environmental aesthetics and arts; ecopoetics; and animal studies.

http://rowman.com/Action/SERIES/LEX/ETAP#

Contact person: Julia Tofantšuk, Tallinn University, Estonia jul@tlu.ee

(posted 23 December 2016)


The Journal of Cultural Mediation

The Journal of Cultural Mediation of the SSML Fondazione Villaggio dei Ragazzi “don Salvatore d’Angelo” focuses on the role of culture in perceiving and translating reality. The aim of this Journal is to promote research in communication, especially by investigating language, languages, cultural models, mediation and interculturality, welcoming contributions focussing on cultural mediation in modern society.
In particular manuscripts should concern:
– The role of the cultural mediator
– Linguistic/cultural mediation teaching methodologies
– Cultural mediation and identity
– Linguistic mediation in specialized discourse
– Analysis of text translations
– Quality interpreting – Interpreting as cultural mediation
– Professionalization and professional issues of interpreters
– Interdisciplinarity within Interpreting Studies
– Teaching methodologies in interpreter training
– Research on any aspect of interpreting in any research paradigm (including cognitive science, psycholinguistics, neurolinguistics, sociolinguistics, applied linguistics, discourse analysis, pragmatics, anthropology, semiotics, comparative cultural studies, cross-cultural communication, etc.)

All papers submitted to The Journal of Cultural Mediation should be original, neither having been previously published nor being considered elsewhere at the time of submission.
Papers can be written in Italian, English, French, Spanish or German, they should not exceed 6000 words and should be preceded by an abstract of 200-250 words. If the language of the paper is not English, please include a translation of the abstract in English as well. At the head of your abstract please indicate the title of the proposal, the name of the author/s, affiliation and email address. Please include five to six keywords.
The editor will select contributions for each issue and notify authors of acceptance or otherwise according to the dates below.
Authors wishing to contribute to the Journal of Cultural Mediation are welcome to submit their abstracts as email attachments to:
jcm.ssmlmaddaloni@yahoo.it

For further information, contributors are encouraged to read the guidelines of the journal, given on our website: http://www.ssmlmaddaloni.it/rivista.asp

(posted 16 February 2012)


The Brontës and the Idea of Influence
A thematic dossier in the “Writers, writings” section of LISA e-journal

In March 2007, Stevie Davies, Patricia Duncker and Michele Roberts gathered around Patsy Stoneman at Haworth in Yorkshire to talk about the influence that the Brontës had had on their evolutions as authors, and more generally, about the source of inspiration that the most famous family of writers in England could represent. Patsy Stoneman had already tackled the topic by publishing a book entitled The Brontë Influence in 2004 with the help of Charmian Knight. The issue of LISA e-journal “Re-Writing Jane Eyre: Jane Eyre, Past and Present” is further evidence of Charlotte Brontë’s influence on the writers of the following decades or centuries. So far, these studies have been quite limited and this field of research, “the Brontë influence”, offers a wide range of possible developments.
Moreover, if the four authors’ poetry and novels have already been the object of numerous studies, there is much left to write about the influences which were exerted on the Brontës, whether religious, literary, philosophical or cultural. Taking account of the context of  a work is often a good way of understanding the issues underlying a text: the path taken by the Brontës, their journeys, their stays abroad, the books they read, etc. could prove to be very enlightening. Besides these external factors, one could also consider the interactions between the three sisters, who wrote in the same room and who read passages from their works aloud.
A final aspect to identify and study could be the influences which are exerted within the Brontës’ works themselves. How can one account for the progress of the heroes and heroines? How is the influence that characters have on one another expressed? What role does nature play in the destiny of characters? Which other elements intervene in the novels?

This dossier devoted to the Brontës intends to analyse the works through the perspective of influence and three different fields of research can thus be considered:
–    influences on the Brontës
–    the idea of influence in the Brontës’ works
–    the Brontë influence on the writers of the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries.
Please send your proposals (one A4 page maximum) to Dr. Élise Ouvrard ouvrard_elise@hotmail.com.
Accepted articles will be published in the thematic dossier “The Brontës and the Idea of Influence” on the website of LISA e-journal:
http://lisa.revues.org/index424.html

(posted 10 January 2008, updated 3 November 2010)


Controversy: Literary Studies and Ethics
JLT-Journal of Literary Theory online

Submissions are continuously accepted.
Are literary scholars and critics supposed to voice their view on normative questions within their academic writings? How far should world views, political opinions and evaluations enter into the scholarly and critical work with literary texts? Is it even possible to exclude such judgements from literary studies? How and why do different traditions of literary studies treat these problems divergently?
Submissions are expected to refer to previous contributions to this controversy by Peter J. Rabinowitz and Marshall W. Gregory, which can be found at http://www.jltonline.de/index.php/articles/article/view/254/775 and at http://www.jltonline.de/index.php/articles/article/view/287/879
Please contact the editorial office for further details at jlt@phil.uni-goettingen.de.

(posted 10 February 2011)

Books and special issues of journals – Deadlines July-September 2017

Women’s work: an ongoing (r)evolution (19th-21st centuries)?
Deadline for proposals: 15 July 2017

Following our international workshop on 16th/17th June this year organised by CRINI (EA1162) at the Faculty of Foreign Languages and Cultures of the University of Nantes (France) we are interested in receiving articles with a view to publication on the theme of changes in women’s work in a historical and European context, from an agrarian-based economy through the upheaval of the industrial revolution and later of the digital revolution has affected women’s employment and work opportunities since the 19th century.

The issues raised, for women and more specifically mothers, are multifaceted and complex. In the context of the (work) landscape and environment, one might consider first of all the issue of travel to and from work/commuting, the shift in the relationship between home and work, the restructuration of families’ and women’s lives around these changes and over those three centuries.

What impact have these changes had on the use and perception of production tools, which started as specific and traditional/iconic items (such as the spinning wheel or the weaving loom) and have, in some cases, become dematerialised or virtual.

Other possible thematics could include the way in which women, at various times in history, have claimed or reclaimed ownership of these tools through arts and crafts activities and working from home; the possession (or lack of possession) of tools and the control (or lack of control) over working conditions and hours.

Last but not least, there are some interesting comparisons to be made between different working environments, in the context of globalisation, growing competition, flexibility or lack thereof begging the question whether the workplace has become more or less woman- and even more so, mother-friendly.

Articles in English between 6,000 and 10,000 words together with a 300-word abstract and a short biographical note should be sent to martine.stirling@univ-nantes.fr and delphine.sangu@univ-nantes.fr by July 15th, 2017 for publication early 2018.

Publications in French

BUSSY GENEVOIS Danièle, «Propos féminins sur le travail (1860-1933)», Mélanges de la Casa de Velázquez, 40-2, 2010, p.117-134.

FINDING Susan et KOBER-SMITH Anémone (dir.), Politiques familiales et politiques d’emploi “genrées” au Royaume-Uni et en Europe, Observatoire de la société britannique, No 14, juin 2013.

KNITTEL Fabien et RAGGI Pascal (dirs.), Genre et Techniques. XIXe – XXIe siècle, Rennes, Presses universitaires de Rennes, collection « Histoire », 2012.

PERROT, Michelle, Mélancolie ouvrière : « Je suis entrée comme apprentie, j’avais alors douze ans », Lucie Baud, 1908, Paris, Grasset, coll. « Héroïnes », 2012.

Publications in English

GLOVER Judith and KIRTON Jill, Women, Employment and Organizations, London, Routledge, 2006.

GLUCKSMANN Miriam, Cottons and Casuals: the Gendered organization of Labour in Time and Space, Durham, Sociologypress, 2000.

HAKIM Catherine, Key Issues in Women’s Work: Female Diversity and the polarization of women’s employment, London, Routledge, 2004.

PFAU-EFFINGER Birgit , FLAQUER Lluis and JENSEN Per, Formal and Informal Work: the Hiddden work regime in Europe, London, Routledge, 2012.

Publications in Spanish

BORDERÍAS MONDEJAR Cristina (ed.), Género y políticas del trabajo en la España contemporánea 1836-1936, Icaria Editorial, Universitat de Barcelona, 2007.

CARRASCO Cristina, (ed.), Tiempos, trabajos y flexibilidad: una cuestión de género, Serie Estudios n°. 78, Madrid, Instituto de la Mujer, 2003.

ORTEGA María Teresa (ed.), Jornaleras, campesinas y agricultoras. La historia agraria desde una perspectiva de género, Zaragoza, SEHA, Prensas Universitarias de Zaragoza, 2015.

MUÑOZ ABELEDO Luisa, Género, trabajo y niveles de vida en la industria conservera de Galicia, 1870-1970, Icaria Editorial, Universitat de Barcelona, 2010.

(posted 18 January 2017)


Katherine Mansfield and Virginia Woolf
Volume 10 of Katherine Mansfield Studies
Deadline for submissions: 31 August 2017

The Katherine Mansfield Society is pleased to announce its Call for Papers for volume 10 of Katherine Mansfield Studies, as well as its annual essay prize. Our theme for this year is Katherine Mansfield and Virginia Woolf.  Alongside the permanent editors, Professor Todd Martin and Dr Gerri Kimber, the volume will be guest-edited by Professor Christine Froula of Northwestern University, USA, who is also Chair of the specialist judging panel for the essay prize. The other judges are: Professor Christine Reynier, Stuart N. Clarke, and Dr Kathryn Simpson.

The deadline for submissions is 31 August 2017. All details can be found by going to the following web pages of the Katherine Mansfield Society, where PDFs of the CFPs can be downloaded:

General CFP for Volume 10: http://www.katherinemansfieldsociety.org/yearbook-katherine-mansfield-studies/
Essay Prize CFP: http://www.katherinemansfieldsociety.org/essay-prize/

All essays submitted for publication will be considered for the Essay Prize, unless we are advised alternatively. (Contributors whose essays are subsequently selected for publication must be members of the Katherine Mansfield Society.)

(posted 2 February)


(Re)Defining Gender in Early Modern British Drama (1550-1700): Power, Sexualities and Ideologies in Text and Performance (tentative title)
A collection of essays
Deadline for proposals: 15 Sseptember 2017

The focus of this collection of essays will be the construction, performance and circulation of gender
ideologies in Early Modern (1550-1700) British drama. The aim of the volume will be to explore the
enactment of both normative and transgressive gender identities in Early Modern dramatic texts and
performances. We are particularly interested in the intersections between drama, literature, history,
culture and material practices and how power is exerted, reaffirmed and/or subverted.
Possible areas of interest may include, but are not limited to:

  • Constructions and meanings of masculinities and femininities
  • Gendering the stage: entrances, exits, stage directions, prologues and epilogues; spatial
    representations of the public/private, masculine/feminine, outdoors/indoors…
  • The gendered body on and off stage: characters and performers
  • Gendered activities, behaviours and objetcs: banqueting, dancing, courting, gossiping,
    costumes, props…
  • Sexual violence, (ab)use and power relations; representing desire
  • Family, kinship, marriage, homosocial relations, friendship
  • Female and male authorship, the playwright’s dramatic persona
  • Politics and drama: representations of the Soverign, ideologies on stage, relations between
    the Monarch, Courtiers, audiences, performers and playwrights
  • 18th- to 21st-century adaptations, appropiations and emulations; transnational rewritings of
    Early Modern British drama

Abstracts (max 500 words) on any of the above mentioned topics, together with a short bio (around
100 words) and 5-6 keywords should be sent to earlymodern.gender@gmail.com by September 15th
2017. Applicants can expect to hear back about their proposals by mid-October. If accepted, the final
draft version of your chapter (6,000 – 8,000 words, MLA style) would most likely be due by February
2018; acceptance and modifications will be notified by April 2018 and final versions of chapters will
be required by May 2018. Note that these deadlines may be subject to change.
Should you have any questions, please feel free to contact us via email.

(posted 19 June 2017)